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If I am turning on the WaitCursor before a processing task and then turning it back to default, I often get this pattern of code:

try {
    Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
    MyProcessingTask();
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}
finally { Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; }

I need to have the Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; in the catch block so that the MessageBox is given a default cursor to use.

Is there a better way to write this code without having to write two Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; statements?

share|improve this question
    
You could remove the finally block and have the Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; statement after the MyProcessingTask(); call; otherwise I think you're stuck with having it twice. –  Tim Sep 30 '12 at 8:09
    
Have you tried putting a try ... finally statement into the try block of the try ... catch statement? –  O. R. Mapper Sep 30 '12 at 8:10
    
@Tim: If I put it after MyProcessingTask();, then if an exception is raised by MyProcessingTask() I will still need to have it also in the catch block, won't I? –  CJ7 Sep 30 '12 at 8:10
    
@O.R.Mapper: can you elaborate? –  CJ7 Sep 30 '12 at 8:11
    
@CJ7: I've added it as an answer. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 30 '12 at 8:13

5 Answers 5

You could create a disposable class and exploit the using syntact-sugar, i.e. :

class WaitingCursor : IDisposable
{
    public WaitingCursor()
    {
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
    }
}

Usage:

try
{
    using (var wcurs = new WaitingCursor())
    {
        MyProcessingTask();
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}
share|improve this answer
    
The OP's concern is changing the cursor back before showing the message box, which isn't done by this solution. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 30 '12 at 8:13
    
@O.R.Mapper: actually, when the MessageBox appears it doesn't show the waitcursor... –  digEmAll Sep 30 '12 at 8:20
    
@O.R.Mapper: however, inverting the using with the try catch you will get the desired result (edited). –  digEmAll Sep 30 '12 at 8:24
    
I didn't try; I just went by the OP's statement I need to have the Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; in the catch block so that the MessageBox is given a default cursor to use.; maybe the sample code was accidentally oversimplified (non-standard message box, for example). Anyway, your edited solution is indeed valid. –  O. R. Mapper Sep 30 '12 at 9:04

How about something like this

        Exception exception = null;
        try
        {
            Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
            MyProcessingTask();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            exception = ex;
        }

        Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
        if (exception!= null)
            MessageBox.Show(exception.ToString());

Even though this seems like a plausable solution, I would rather recomend keeping the double cursor setting as I would prefer that all exception logic be handled inside the Catch block.

share|improve this answer

You could nest a try/finally block inside a try/catch block:

try {
    try {
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
        MyProcessingTask();
    }
    finally { Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; }
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}

Whether this is better or not may be subject to opinion. It reduces some code duplication, but it doesn't (to my eyes) have a "familiar" look to it. Someone may see this in 6 months time and refactor it back into the familiar try/catch/finally structure (and lose the cursor change in the catch block).


By the way - the general pattern of catching all exceptions at this low level is generally frowned upon. By "handling" every possible exception by just displaying the Message, you're losing potential debugging help. I would usually recommend that a) You only handle specific exceptions that your code actually has a sensible strategy for dealing with, and b) Letting all other exceptions propogate out to a top-level exception handler that a) Might display a message, but b) Also logs all relevant parts of the exception, including call stacks, etc.

Swallowing the exception (as here) can mean that the application isn't in a fit state to continue running, but will attempt to do so. Making the final crash (if it happens) far more difficult to diagnose.

share|improve this answer
    
Will the outer catch block handle an exception thrown by MyProcessingTask()? –  CJ7 Sep 30 '12 at 8:16
    
@CJ7: Yes, it will. The finally block doesn't catch the exception, finally just means it's executed even when control-flow otherwise jumps out of the current block (e.g. also when a return statement is within the try block of a try ... finally statement). –  O. R. Mapper Sep 30 '12 at 8:18
    
@CJ7 - Yes. When an exception occurs, it propogates out from the point at which it's thrown until a matching catch clause is found. That catch clause could be anywhere - in the same method, or in any method in the call stack. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 30 '12 at 8:19

Nest a try ... finally statement in the try block of your existing try ... catch statement like this:

try {
    Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
    try {
        MyProcessingTask();
    }
    finally {
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
    }
}
catch (Exception ex) {
    MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
}
share|improve this answer

You can simplify this by extension method:

static void ProcessWithWaitCursor(this Action task)
{
    try {
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.WaitCursor;
        task();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {
        Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default;
        MessageBox.Show(ex.ToString());
    }
    finally { Cursor.Current = Cursors.Default; }

}

then just use it like this:

MyProcessingTask.ProcessWithWaitCursor()

This will eliminate all repeated code from all places where you want to do this.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe OP is trying to eliminate having the same two lines of code in the try/catch - which this solution doesn't. –  Tim Sep 30 '12 at 8:22
    
You are right but the idea is to write less and do the same thing this answer is providing a way to not worry about Cursor at all. What does he gain by eliminating one line? One times all places where he uses this construction in term or lines of code. My solution reduces code to single line. So I think it is relevant. –  Rafal Sep 30 '12 at 8:27

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