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I have 2 arrays :

        int[] arr1 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
        int[] arr2 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };

I need to check if they are equal ( not by ref)

What is the difference between writing :

        Console.WriteLine(arr1.SequenceEqual(arr2)); //true

vs

        IStructuralEquatable eqArray1 = arr1;
        Console.WriteLine(eqArray1.Equals(arr2, StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer));  //true

both returns True..

When should I use each ?

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IStructuralEquatable gives feature to check equality as well as comparision of two arrays. –  Ratan Sharma Sep 30 '12 at 8:29
2  
@leppie I was wonering why you removed the .net4 tag :-) IStructuralEquatable exists only in 4. and thats why i put it there :-) –  Royi Namir Sep 30 '12 at 14:11
    
@RoyiNamir: After I removed it I was wondering the same thing, then I got lazy and forgot about it ;p –  leppie Sep 30 '12 at 15:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The implementation of SequenceEqual is kind of similar::

using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator1 = first.GetEnumerator())
using (IEnumerator<TSource> enumerator2 = second.GetEnumerator())
{
    while (enumerator1.MoveNext())
    {
        if (!enumerator2.MoveNext() || !comparer.Equals(enumerator1.Current, enumerator2.Current))
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    if (enumerator2.MoveNext())
    {
        return false;
    }
}

return true;

This default SequenceEqual method use default EqualityComparer<int>.Default for int which is value equality.

Array implement IStructuralEquatable with Equal method:

bool IStructuralEquatable.Equals(object other, IEqualityComparer comparer)
{
    if (other == null) return false;

    if (!object.ReferenceEquals(this, other))
    {
        Array array = other as Array;
        if ((array == null) || (array.Length != this.Length))
        {
            return false;
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < array.Length; i++)
        {
            object x = this.GetValue(i);
            object y = array.GetValue(i);

            if (!comparer.Equals(x, y))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    return true;
}

The IEqualityComparer from input parameter is used, in here you input StructruralEqualityComparer but int does not implement IStructruralEquatable, so it uses default comparer for int which is value equality.

But, needless to input StructruralEqualityComparer because int is not structural, you should just use:

(arr1 as IStructuralEquatable).Equals(arr2, EqualityComparer<int>.Default);

It still works. You should use StructruralEqualityComparer if item in array is structrural

So to sum up, the implementation for both is kind of the same, both iterate two array based on value equality of int to make comparison.

I would prefer the LINQ verson since it is more readable.

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Standard equality checks in .NET uses EqualityComparer.Default for comparisons. For example dictionaries or SequenceEqual method you have written there uses EqualityComparer.Default by default. And that comparer either uses Equals(object) method or Equals(T) method in presence of IEquatable interface implementation.

But you can always give other comparers like StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer to dictionaries or methods such as SequenceEqual.

So, the main difference between two methods is the equality check method they use. SequenceEqual uses IEquatable interface method for checks, and StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer uses IStructuralEquatable interface method for checks. And as a result, default equality checks need two of the compared items to be the same type but StructuralEqualityComparer doesn't require them to be same type. As the name suggests it is supposed to compare contents.

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The linq version is the most flexible, it can compare two enumerables.
The StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer version require that the two collections can support the IStructuralEquatable interface. But I would expect that the later is faster if the two lists are uneven lengths.

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I just had a related question and saw that this question was never actually answered properly. There is a difference between the structural and the sequence - the first comparison is deep and the second one is not.

This simple code demonstrates and produces True False:

int[][] ints1 = { new int[] { 3, 4 } };
int[][] ints2 = { new int[] { 3, 4 } };
Console.WriteLine(StructuralComparisons.
                          StructuralEqualityComparer.Equals(ints1, ints2));
Console.WriteLine(ints1.SequenceEqual(ints2));

The name "sequence" suggests one-dimensionalism so the name choice is appropriate.

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I think System.Linq is your friend:

bool isEqual = Enumerable.SequenceEqual(array1, array2);
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2  
Thanks but I asked what is the difference. And when should I use which...:-) –  Royi Namir Sep 30 '12 at 8:24

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