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For each level of factor I need to extract values aggregated over all subsets of data.frame except the current one. For example, there is a several subjects doing a reaction time task during several days, and I need to compute mean reaction time for all subjects and all days, but not including the subject for whom the mean is computed. Currently, I do it like this:

 library(lme4)
 ddply(sleepstudy, .(Subject, Days), summarise, 
       avg_rt = mean(sleepstudy[sleepstudy$Subject != Subject &
                   sleepstudy$Days == Days,"Reaction"]), .progress="text")

It works fine for small data sets, but for large ones it can be very slow. Is there a way to do it faster?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#create big dataset
n <- 1e4
set.seed(1)
sleepstudy <- data.frame(Reaction=rnorm(n),Subject=1:4,Days=sort(rep((1:(n/4)),4)))


library(plyr)
system.time(
  res <- ddply(sleepstudy, .(Subject, Days), summarise, 
               avg_rt = mean(sleepstudy[sleepstudy$Subject != Subject &
                 sleepstudy$Days == Days,"Reaction"]))
)
#User      System      elapsed 
#6.532       0.013       6.556  

#use data.table for big datasets
library(data.table)

dt<- as.data.table(sleepstudy)
system.time(
 {dt[,avg_rt:=mean(Reaction),by=Days];
  dt[,n:=.N,by=Days];
  dt[,avg_rt:=(avg_rt*n-Reaction)/(n-1)]}
)
#User      System      elapsed 
#0.005       0.001       0.005 


#test if results are equal
dt2 <- as.data.table(res)
setkey(dt2,Subject,Days)
setkey(dt,Subject,Days)
all.equal(dt[,avg_rt],dt2[,avg_rt])
#[1] TRUE

For really large datasets the speed gain should be more pronounced. I just couldn't compare with larger datasets since ddply is so slow.

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Thanks, it works great. Even if the same algorithm is used with ddply, data.table is still faster. It is also possible to control for multiple observations for each Subject X Days combination with something like: dt[,sn:=.N,by=c("Subject","Days")]; dt[,s_avg_rt:=ifelse(sn==1,Reaction,.SD[,sum(Reaction)]),by=c("Subject","Days")]‌​; dt[,avg_rt1:=(avg_rt*n-s_avg_rt)/(n-sn)]; –  Andrey Chetverikov Sep 30 '12 at 14:07
    
@Andrey Chetverikov I made a small change that improved performance considerably. –  Roland Sep 30 '12 at 18:57
    
@Roland Well spotted! –  Matt Dowle Sep 30 '12 at 19:47
    
@Matthew Dowle Is it possible to do a "by not" with data.table like the ddply code is doing? Here it was possible to use simple algebra, but that might not always be the case (e.g., lets assume I want to use lm on all values except the current group). –  Roland Oct 1 '12 at 7:33
1  
@Roland And .I might be useful for that too (when implemented); e.g., DT[,DT[-.I],by=...]. –  Matt Dowle Oct 1 '12 at 10:56

Maybe it's faster with lapply and aggregate:

do.call("rbind", (lapply(unique(sleepstudy$Subject),
                         function(x)
                           cbind(Subject = x,
                                 aggregate(Reaction ~ Days,
                                           subset(sleepstudy, Subject != x),
                                           mean)))))

Update:

I compared both commands with system.time and it appears the original is slower.

library(lme4)
library(plyr)

system.time(
ddply(sleepstudy, .(Subject, Days), summarise, 
      avg_rt = mean(sleepstudy[sleepstudy$Subject != Subject &
                    sleepstudy$Days == Days,"Reaction"]))
)

   # user  system elapsed 
   # 0.17    0.00    0.22 

system.time(
do.call("rbind", (lapply(unique(sleepstudy$Subject),
                         function(x) 
                           cbind(Subject = x,
                                 aggregate(Reaction ~ Days,
                                           subset(sleepstudy, Subject != x),
                                           mean)))))
)


   # user  system elapsed 
   # 0.12    0.00    0.12 
share|improve this answer
    
For small data sets this works better than original, but on the big ones original is still better. pastebin.com/Zb4CaJrN For 184320 rows its 6.041s for original and 10.96s for lapply and aggregate –  Andrey Chetverikov Sep 30 '12 at 11:34

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