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I have a file:

@Book{gjn2011ske, 
  author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  title =    {Semantic Knowledge Engineering. A Rule-Based Approach},
  publisher =    {Wydawnictwa AGH},
  year =     2011,
  address =  {Krak\'ow}
}

@article{gjn2010jucs,
  Author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  Journal =  {Journal of Universal Computer Science},
  Number =   7,
  Pages =    {1006-1023},
  Title =    {Collective Knowledge Engineering with Semantic Wikis},
  Volume =   16,
  Year =     2010
}

I want to improve the regular expression that only removed the first line. Note: The record separator RS="}\n" can not be changed.

I tried:

awk 'BEGIN{ RS="}\n" } {gsub(/@.*,/,"") ; print }' file

I want to print the result:

  author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  title =    {Semantic Knowledge Engineering. A Rule-Based Approach},
  publisher =    {Wydawnictwa AGH},
  year =     2011,
  address =  {Krak\'ow}

  Author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  Journal =  {Journal of Universal Computer Science},
  Number =   7,
  Pages =    {1006-1023},
  Title =    {Collective Knowledge Engineering with Semantic Wikis},
  Volume =   16,
  Year =     2010

Thank you for your help.

EDIT:

My proposed solution:

awk 'BEGIN{ RS="}\n" }{sub(",","@"); sub(/@.*@/,""); print }' file 
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's hard to accomplish what you want with the specified RS setting (because the address = {Krak\'ow} has an extra record ending). I'd rather go with:

awk '$0 !~ "^@" && $0 !~ "^} *$" { print }' FILE 

See it in action here.

EDIT I don't know why it must be with a regexp solution, could you please explain it?

Anyway, yet another (working, see here) solution which uses regexp(s), but not the ones you are expecting.:

awk 'BEGIN{ RS="}\n" }
{
  split($0,a,"\n")
  for (e=1;e<=length(a);e++) {
      if (a[e] ~ "{" && a[e] !~ "}") {
          sub("$","}",a[e])
      }
      if (a[e] ~ "=") { print a[e] }
  }
  printf("\n")
}' INPUTFILE

One more, with a much simpler regexp, but it fails, with the "address" line as the last } will be removed with your RS, and it will print a final }...

awk 'BEGIN{ RS="}\n" }
{
  sub("@[^,]\+,","")
  print $0
}' INPUTFILE
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the solution, but the wait still, for example, a regular expression. See my edit, and proposed solutions. – Tedee12345 Sep 30 '12 at 14:04
    
Yet abother solution. – Zsolt Botykai Sep 30 '12 at 20:24
    
Thanks again for your reply. Your first proposed solution suits me. – Tedee12345 Oct 1 '12 at 11:17

One way without using regular expressions. Set Field Separator to a newline and now each key of a register will be a field. With that, traverse each field and print those that don't begin with @:

awk '
    BEGIN { 
        RS="}\n"; 
        FS=OFS="\n"; 
    } 
    { 
        for (i=1; i<=NF; i++) { 
            if ( substr($i, 1, 1) != "@" ) { 
                printf "%s%s", $i, (i == NF) ? RS : OFS; 
            } 
        } 
    }
' file

Output:

author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
title =    {Semantic Knowledge Engineering. A Rule-Based Approach},
publisher =    {Wydawnictwa AGH},
year =     2011,
address =  {Krak\'ow}

Author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
Journal =  {Journal of Universal Computer Science},
Number =   7,
Pages =    {1006-1023},
Title =    {Collective Knowledge Engineering with Semantic Wikis},
Volume =   16,
Year =     2010
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the solution. Your example leaves the "}" at the end of the last line. See my edit, and proposed solutions. – Tedee12345 Sep 30 '12 at 13:49

I would use GNU sed to do this:

sed '/^@/,/^}$/ { //d }' file.txt

Results:

  author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  title =    {Semantic Knowledge Engineering. A Rule-Based Approach},
  publisher =    {Wydawnictwa AGH},
  year =     2011,
  address =  {Krak\'ow}

  Author =   {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  Journal =  {Journal of Universal Computer Science},
  Number =   7,
  Pages =    {1006-1023},
  Title =    {Collective Knowledge Engineering with Semantic Wikis},
  Volume =   16,
  Year =     2010

Note that you can use the -i flag to make the changes in-place (i.e. overwrite the files contents) and you can use the -s flag to make the changes to multiple files. For example:

sed -s -i '/^@/,/^}$/ { //d }' *.txt
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the solution, but the wait still, for example, a regular expression. See my edit, and proposed solutions. – Tedee12345 Sep 30 '12 at 14:03
    
@Tedee12345: Not being able to change awk's record separator creates more problems than it solves. And coding around these problems is never a good idea. You should consider posting why you think keeping RS="}\n" is a good idea. If so, please include more sample data. Good luck. – Steve Oct 1 '12 at 10:13
    
Once again, thanks for the explanation. – Tedee12345 Oct 1 '12 at 11:20
awk '{if($0!~/@/&&$0!~/^}/)print}' temp

tested below:

> awk '{if($0!~/@/&&$0!~/^}/)print}' temp
  author =       {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  title =        {Semantic Knowledge Engineering. A Rule-Based Approach},
  publisher =    {Wydawnictwa AGH},
  year =         2011,
  address =      {Krak\'ow}

  Author =       {Grzegorz J. Nalepa},
  Journal =      {Journal of Universal Computer Science},
  Number =       7,
  Pages =        {1006-1023},
  Title =        {Collective Knowledge Engineering with Semantic Wikis},
  Volume =       16,
  Year =         2010
>
share|improve this answer
    
This answer is almost identical to Zolts answer 20 hours ago. You should consider up-voting it, like I have. – Steve Oct 1 '12 at 10:15
    
Thank you for your example of a solution. – Tedee12345 Oct 1 '12 at 11:23

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