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I have a Base class with a method that a child class will almost always override. However, instead of replacing the base class' method entirely, I would like for whatever is derived in the child class to be added to what is already in the base class.

For Example:

class BaseClass{

public string str()
 {
   return "Hello my name is" ;
 }
}

class ChildClass : BaseClass{

public override string str() 
 {
   return "Sam";
 }
}

The point is that if I want to access the str() method by creating an instance of the ChildClass, the string will print out as "Hello, my name is Sam".

I've been looking around and all I have been finding is that this should NOT happen, as the base class shouldn't even know that it is being inherited. So, if the design is false, how would I go about doing this? Keep in mind that there will be multiple child classes inheriting from BaseClass.

Thank you

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2  
If the base class must depend on the child class, you may want to consider making the base class abstract. –  Anthony Sottile Sep 30 '12 at 13:28
    
First of all, you shloud provide a valid, complete and compilable example of your problem. Not a bunch of syntactically invalid lines of code. –  Ondrej Tucny Sep 30 '12 at 14:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you always want to do this, and you don't want to rely on implementers of the derived classes to remember to override the method and call into the base class, you can use a template pattern:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public string str()
    {
        return "Hello my name is " + Name;
    }

    protected abstract string Name { get; }
}

Now any non-abstract class that inherits BaseClass will be required by the compiler to override Name, and that value can be consumed by BaseClass.

public class ChildClass : BaseClass
{
    protected override string Name
    {
        get { return "Sam"; }
    }
}

Obviously, this depends on the base class being abstract.

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Exactly the code I was about to post. You should never require that a derived class call your base method, since there is no way for the compiler to enforce that, but the compiler will force you to implement an abstract method. Defensive programming and mentioned in the wonderful book "Framework Design Guidelines" –  Jason Hermann Sep 30 '12 at 13:34
    
Thank you, this is exactly what I needed. –  Junk Junk Oct 1 '12 at 0:57

If you want to call base class method:

1.Declare the method in base class as virtual, so that you can override from child class.

2.Use base to call method from base class.

internal class BaseClass
{
    public virtual string str()
    {
        return "Hello my name is" ;
    }
}

class ChildClass : BaseClass
{
    public override string str(){
        return base.str() + "Sam";
    }
}
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First you have to make your method virual otherwise you can't override it:

public class BaseClass
{
  public virual string Str()
  {
    return "Hello my name is ";
  }
}

And then in your child class you can use base to access the method in your base class.

public class ChildClass : BaseClass
{
  public override string Str()
  {
    return base.Str() + "Sam";
  }
}
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