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int a = 17 (=10001)

int b=5 (101)

a&b      1         bitwise AND
a|b     21         bitwise OR
a^b     20         XOR (16+4) “just one”
a&&b     1         logical AND
a||b     1         logical OR
-b      -5         minus b
~b       -6         ?
~(~a)      17        ?
!b       0         logical “NOT B”
!(!a))   1         logical “NOT NOT A”
a=b      0         “a==b?”
a=’A’   65         ?
a|’@’   64         ?

Can you please help me explain the parts where the ? is.

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closed as not constructive by Toon Krijthe, Abhinav Sarkar, Baz, Mihai Iorga, Sergey K. Oct 1 '12 at 9:38

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1  
value of a = b is 5; value of a == b is 0 –  pmg Sep 30 '12 at 13:44
    
In C, a=b and a='A' are not just assignments, they are assignment expressions and as such have values (just like a+b), those are the values that get assigned to the variable (b and 'A', respectively), IOW, the new (post-assignment) values of the variable. –  Alexey Frunze Sep 30 '12 at 13:57
1  
This looks like homework and should be tagged as such. If it isn't, ignore this comment. :) –  leemes Sep 30 '12 at 14:51
    
@leemes It says the homework tag should not be used. It is homework. –  Niklas in Stockholm Oct 1 '12 at 5:14

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
~b       -6         ?

The "~" flips all the bits, and negative numbers are represented using something called 2s complement. The -6 is just what happens when you flip all the bits of "5": you get a different bitpattern, which is the same bits as "-6" in 2s complement.

~(~a)      17        ?

Similar. Flip all the bits, then flip all the bits again, and what do you get? The same as before.

a=’A’   65         ?

Internally, characters are represented by numbers, just like everything else in a computer. Virtually all these number<->character tables in use today are based on ASCII, and 'A' just happens to have the number 65 in the ASCII table.

a|’@’   64         ?

That doesn't make sense. '@' is 64 (ASCII, again), which is hex 0x40. 0x40 | 17 should be 81.

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"Internally, characters are represented by numbers, just like everything else in a computer." A little bit better would be: "Internally, characters are represented by some bits, just like everything else in a computer, like numbers." Because numbers are already an interpretation of some bits. (Otherwise we wouldn't need something like the two's complement, since -1 is a number! But it needs to be stored using some bits and thus needs a kind of interpretation and representation.) –  leemes Sep 30 '12 at 14:49
    
This is the moste elaborate answer since it spec mentions 2s complement that I was unsure of was getting used. –  Niklas in Stockholm Oct 14 '12 at 12:20

- is unary negative. It just takes the negative of the value, assuming no overflow. And negative 5 is obviously `-5'.

~ is bitwise complement. I'd recommend you lookup how it works. In two's complement, ~x is equivalent to -x - 1. And for ~(~a), obviously the complement of the complement is the original number.

For the last two, you are just taking a character and treating it as a number. This just uses the ascii value of the character. The value of 'A' is 65, but I highly doubt your teacher expects you to memorize them all. You'll probably get an ascii table.

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Provided that a = 17 (10001 binary) and b = 5 (101 binary) we have:

a&b      1         bitwise AND
a|b     21         bitwise OR
a^b     20         XOR (16+4) “just one”
a&&b     1         logical AND
a||b     1         logical OR
-b      -5         minus b
~b       -6         bitwise NOT 
~(~a)      17        bitwise NON NOT - the same as a
!b       0         logical “NOT B”
!(!a))   1         logical “NOT NOT A”
a=b      5         assignment to a the value of b
a='A'   65         assignment to a the ASCII value of char 'A'
a|'@'   81         a OR ASCII value of char '@' 
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@pmg to your last edit... if we assume that two last rows are executed sequentially the resulting value would be 65 –  Serge Sep 30 '12 at 14:05
    
right, but I don't think that's the idea of the OP. After all he posted a bunch of simple expressions, not statements. –  pmg Sep 30 '12 at 14:14
    
@pmg then why did you change 64 with 81? –  Serge Sep 30 '12 at 14:16
    
I changed 69 (result of 5 | 64) to 81 (result of 17 | 64). The original post had 64, which I had changed previously to 69 (thinking a had the value 5). –  pmg Sep 30 '12 at 14:30

The ~ operator is bitwise NOT, which means all bits of the int are inverted. What effect that will have on the number depends on the type and implementation.

The | operator is a bitwise OR. In C, it is perfectly valid to OR an int with a char, as you do in a|'A'. The value of the char is then the ASCII number.

The = operator is assignment. The result of an assignment is whatever has been assigned.

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  • = : Assignment operator.
  • ~ : Bitwise NOT operator (logical negation on each bit).
  • | : Bitwise OR operator (logical inclusive OR on each bit).
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~b - binary NOT b
~(~a) - binary NOT ( NOT a )
a='@' - assign the int value of '@' to a
a|'A' - bitwise OR with the int value of 'A'
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2  
'@' is an int. There is no conversion from/to char –  pmg Sep 30 '12 at 13:48
    
@pmg Are you sure? I thought '_' (where _ is an arbitrary character) is of type char, NOT int. –  leemes Sep 30 '12 at 14:45
    
In C, '_' is of type int (I believe it's different in C++). See 6.4.4.4/10 in the C2011 Standard. –  pmg Sep 30 '12 at 14:52
    
right, corrected –  wroniasty Sep 30 '12 at 14:54

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