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I have a project that consists of several nod.js backend applications. The apps are using the same modules (which a placed outside of each ap folder in shared location). The aps they are to be deployed on differnt environments (servers), some code is for test, some for debug as usual.

If I choosed a platform (for example PaaS nodejitsu) for one of my apps, how I'm supposed to send there only production code for one of my apps? I deployed on nodejitsu and it just sends the app folder and uses package.json to configure the app. But there are a bunch of code that is not need (tests) for example and some code is external. And what If I want to obstruct server code too? How this issues are supposed to be soleved?

For front-end applications has a tons of methods to be build for production. I understand that the requirements are different, but didn't find any infromation on best practices fo how correctly to prepare node.js back end application for deploy.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add those test files in .gitignore

or make another branch for production in git and push the production branch.

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is it possible to with npm config? –  WHITECOLOR Sep 30 '12 at 15:32
Another option is .npmignore. –  Joshua Holbrook Sep 30 '12 at 18:42

Read section "Keeping files out of your package" in the NPM Developer page. It states following

Use a .npmignorefile to keep stuff out of your package. If there's no .npmignore file, but there is a .gitignore file, then npm will ignore the stuff matched by the .gitignore file. If you want to include something that is excluded by your .gitignore file, you can create an empty .npmignore file to override it.

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ok, thank, you for the advice.) –  WHITECOLOR Oct 2 '12 at 4:37

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