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For example I make the recursive call defined below. The method finds the kth element from the last. If found, it assigns the current node to the object I pass to the recursive call. For some reason the node kth is null. Can you not do things this way? And why?

public void findKthFromLast(Node head, int k){
    Node kth;     
    recrusiveHelper(head, k, kth);
    System.out.println(kth.data); //this is null
}

public int recursiveHelper(Node n, int k, Node kthFromLast){
    (if n == null){
        return 0;
    }
    val = 1 + recursiveHelper(n.next, k, kthFromlast);
    if(k == val){
        kthFromLast = n;
    }
    return val;
}
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2  
1st of all, a void method can't have a return statement. –  amphibient Sep 30 '12 at 14:34
1  
@Quoi No, The recursiveHelper() method doesent call itself, it jsut calls recursive() –  Suraj Chandran Sep 30 '12 at 14:36
    
And second, the objects are transferred "by reference". But the reference to the object is "by value". That means, if you access kthFromLast.someMember it would affect the caller's object, but if you assign to kthFromLast - it will not. –  onon15 Sep 30 '12 at 14:37
    
what does the recursive method do ? recursive(n, k, kthFromlast) -- where is the code for that? –  amphibient Sep 30 '12 at 14:38
    
Sorry guys I made some changes. I was just typing this from the top of my head. –  user1099123 Sep 30 '12 at 14:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, that code shouldn't compile because kth is not initialized and so cannot be used as argument for the recursiveHelper method call.

Secondly, any changes to the references in a called method are not propagated to the caller in Java, i.e.

private void caller()
{
    StringBuilder s = new StringBuilder();
    s.append("test");
    calledMethod1(s);
    System.out.println(s.toString());
    calledMethod2(s);
    System.out.println(s.toString());
}

private void calledMethod1(StringBuilder buffer)
{
    buffer = new StringBuilder();
    buffer.append("calledMethod1");
    return;
}

private void calledMethod2(StringBuilder buffer)
{
    buffer.append(", calledMethod2");
    return;
}

Output:

test
test, calledMethod2

The reason is, in calledMethod1 you are merely changing what buffer reference points to but not making any changes to what buffer reference was pointing when the method was called. In calledMethod2, you are making changes to the object referred by buffer and hence the changes are visible in the caller.

If you are someone coming from C or C++ background, this is equivalent to assigning to a pointer argument in a called method which doesn't affect what was passed in the caller.

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+1 for catching missing initialization. –  dantuch Sep 30 '12 at 14:45
    
I'm not creating a new object though. I'm assigning an object reference to kth which exists in the parent calling method. –  user1099123 Sep 30 '12 at 14:57
    
What matters is you are assigning to a reference argument (either by creating a new object or by using another reference) and that just doesn't reflect in the caller method. –  Vikdor Sep 30 '12 at 14:58

If the object reference is local to the method, then changes to it wont be visible to caller or anyone else.

E.g:

void caller()
{
    obj = new String("asdf");
    doStuff(obj)
    System.out.println(obj) // still prints "asdf"
}

void doStuff(String obj)
{  
   // obj is a local reference, changing it wont affect caller's ref 
   obj = new String("ghj");
}
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public void findKthFromLast(Node head, int k){
    Node kth;     
    recrusiveHelper(head, k, kth);
    System.out.println(kth.data); //this is null
}

You pass null to the method, whatever you do inside that method, outside this will remain being null. You cannot change the value of reference in a way that is visible outside of method doing so.

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