Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I need ensure the data safety (no unwanted reading or writing) in a software that will be running in the user machine (both application and database).

I know for sure that storing the DB credentials hardcoded isn't a good one, but in this scenario it seems I am running short of alternatives. If I can't avoid this, is there a way PostgreSQL will keep an access log safe from user modification?

What is the best approach to avoid user access to a database stored in its own machine?

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a reason they will be using a full version of Postgres on their local machine? It seems that if you need to protect access, an embedded database like H2 - where you can encrypt the datafile might be good. With a database server like postgres - if a user has root access on their machine, then they will be able to get into the db with some quick modifications to the PG_HBA.CONF file. –  jcern Sep 30 '12 at 15:07
    
you wanna secure the data or the credentials? –  Neil McGuigan Sep 30 '12 at 18:21
    
@NeilMcGuigan The final goal is to protect the data, so the credentials hardcoded is a major problem. –  ChrisAndrew Sep 30 '12 at 21:52
    
@jcern H2 seems to be a good choice. Are there other similar and reliable for C++? –  ChrisAndrew Sep 30 '12 at 21:53
    
I am not that familiar with libraries for c++, but there are a bunch of embeddable databases that seem to offer support. Take a look at: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embedded_database - MySQL and ITTIA seem like they might work in that situation. –  jcern Sep 30 '12 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

i'm pretty sure they can always gain access to the database on their own machine. even if they don't know the password, they can make themselves root and change it.

why don't you encrypt the data instead?

encrypt it with your public key. keep your public key on their machine.

send data to your own server. use your private key to decrypt it.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one, but it's for an offline solution. I can't force the user enable internet connectivity in the environment where it will be running –  ChrisAndrew Sep 30 '12 at 21:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.