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i am programing something in android, and i want to create a delay. when i add to my activity class thread, the app stack after implement data to variable, but when i use handler(with postDelay) it works fine. 1.why?

the code (mapView and userPointOverlay are class private local variables):

using thread:

                new Thread(new Runnable()       //2.5sec delay between switches
                {

                    @Override
                    public void run()
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            Thread.sleep(5000);             
                            mapView.getOverlays().remove(userPointOverlay); 
                        } catch (InterruptedException e)
                        {
                            e.printStackTrace();
                        }                           
                    }
                }).start();

using handler:

                handler.postDelayed(new Runnable()
                {

                    @Override
                    public void run()
                    {
                        mapView.getOverlays().remove(userPointOverlay);                     
                    }
                }, 5000);   

2.what is the main diffrence between thread and handler? i understood that the handler run on the thread i call him from it (share with main thread cpu time), its currect?

  1. it look like i have access to class local variables from handler. but in thread, the eclipse let me write local class variables in thread but when it starts the address of this locals is not as the thread locals and i dont hava access to this class locals when thread run.

thank you!!!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the 1st option, it is forbidden to access views such as mapView or any UI component from another thread other than the UI thread, which is why the Thread version will fail.

For a delay, the 2nd option using the Handler is the better way to do it and does not fail because the Handler is declared on the UI thread, which brings an important point about Handlers - Handlers operate on the thread that they are created on, but that thread must be initialized as Looper thread, such as the UI thread.

It would also be great if you can post the exception for clarity.

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your answer helped me. I have a question about the first answer: when i use AsyncTask i can change progress bar progress value. if the progress bar is a UI component, and i cant change UI componenet from another thread, how the asyncTask do it? –  15412s Sep 30 '12 at 21:45
    
It depends where you change the progress bar value, if its in onProgressUpdate(...) then this is scheduled to run on the UI thread, the only lifecycle method of an AsyncTask that runs on a background thread is doInBackground(...), all other methods I believe run on the UI thread, such as onPreExecute(...), onPostExecute(...) and onProgressUpdate(...) –  Ian Warwick Oct 1 '12 at 6:28
    
your answers helped me. Thank You!!! –  15412s Oct 1 '12 at 14:59

I do not understand the first question. Please rephrase it

The difference between a Handler and a Thread is big. The Android SDK allows changes to the UI / Activity thread only from the thread it runs on.

In other words, you cannot make a change to a TextView or Button from a different thread.

Android provides the Handler class, which allows you send messages from one thread to another.

What you should do is place a public static Handler member in your main activity and implement the handleMessage method somewhere in the class.

Now when you are within a separate thread, make a call to your Handler.

There are several methods that the Handler class provides, such as sendEmptyMessage(int) and sendMessage(Message). Use what best suits your application.

Also, in the example you provided, you are using the Handler.post() method. In this case, it will just create a new Runnable on your main thread and won't make a call to the handleMessage method.

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Private fields in a class are only accessible in the class declaring them and inner classes of that class. Your handler is a field of your class and the handler code itself is an inner class. Because your runnable is created on a new thread, it cannot access the declaring class private fields. You could do something like this:

class MyClass {

   private MapView mapView;
   private Boolean usePointerOverlay;

   private static Thread thread;

   void method(){

      thread = new Thread(new Runnable.....

   }
}
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