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I am mucking around with scala implementing some common algorithms. While attempting to recreate a bubble sort I ran into this issue

Here is an implementation of an the inner loop that bubbles the value to the top:

def pass(xs:List[Int]):List[Int] = xs match { 
  case Nil => Nil 
  case x::Nil => x::Nil 
  case l::r::xs if(l>r) => r::pass(l::xs)
  case l::r::xs => l::pass(r::xs)
}

My issue is with case Nil => Nil. I understand that I need this is because I could apply Nil to this function. Is there a way to ensure that Nil can't be provided as an argument in a manner that would satisfy the compiler so I can eliminate this case?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

List has two subtypes, Nil and ::, so :: represents a list that has at least one element.

def pass(xs: ::[Int]):List[Int] = xs match { 
  case x::Nil => x::Nil 
  case l::r::xs if(l>r) => r::pass(new ::(l,xs))
  case l::r::xs => l::pass(new ::(r, xs))
}
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1  
Ah, good, I was unaware of this, as I don't know Scala :-) –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:10
1  
Note that this means you'll be unable to apply this function to List[Int] values in general, because the compiler usually isn't aware whether any given List[Int] will be empty or not at runtime (doing so in general requires solving the Halting Problem). Pattern matching is the mechanism by which a general unknown List[Int] value can go down two different branches depending on whether it's Nil or a ::[Int]. That means that if you're passing around lists as List[Int], you'd usually have to pattern match on them every time you call pass. –  Ben Oct 1 '12 at 2:26
    
And you can't even call it like pass(1::2::Nil)... –  Kim Stebel Oct 1 '12 at 4:01

In that case you can simply play with the case clauses order:

def pass(xs:List[Int]):List[Int] = xs match { 
  case l::r::xs if(l>r) => r::pass(l::xs)
  case l::r::xs => l::pass(r::xs)
  case xs => xs
}

The first two clauses will only match lists with one or more elements. The last clause will match elsewhere.

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1  
I don't see how this precludes Nil being passed in. The compiler still cannot enforce that Nil be passed as an argument given the reordering. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:38
    
It does not preclude it, but allows to "ommit the Nil case" as stated in the question title. –  paradigmatic Sep 30 '12 at 16:39
1  
Perhaps agrees with the title, but does not agree with the statement that the OP wants to "ensure that Nil can't be provided as an argument in a manner that would satisfy the compiler so I can eliminate this case" –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:45
2  
I interpreted the last sentence of the question as a bonus point. I don't think it is off-topic and it can still help some users. I may be wrong. –  paradigmatic Sep 30 '12 at 16:49
    
I don't disagree. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:49

This would roughly correspond to a refinement of the original type, where you would write a type whose members were a subset of the initial type. You would then show that, for every input x to your function, that x was non Nil. As this requires a good amount of proof (you can implement this in Coq with dependent types using a subset type), the better thing to do in this situation might be to introduce a new type, which was a list having no Nil constructor, only a constructor for cons and a single element.

EDIT: As Scala allows you to use subtyping over the List type to enforce this, you can prove it in the type system decidably using that subtype. This is still a proof, in the sense that any type checking corresponds to a proof that the program does indeed inhabit some type, it's just something the compiler can prove completely.

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why the downvote? I don't see anything wrong with this answer? Can you point out something technically incorrect in it? If so I will change or remove it. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:36
    
Because you can use the trick proposed by Kim Stebel without resorting to any kind of complex proof... –  paradigmatic Sep 30 '12 at 16:38
    
@paradigmatic wrong, it still corresponds to a proof in the type system, the proof is via subtyping, so there's still a proof, it's just in a decidable logic. Still a proof, but I edited my answer to note yours. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:39
    
Yes, but it is not a "complex proof". It does not imply dependent types, or a state-of-the-art theorem prover like Coq. –  paradigmatic Sep 30 '12 at 16:41
    
@paradigmatic okay, that's fair, I don't see "complex proof" in my answer anywhere, but I do see a good amount. I'll still leave it with the caveat that this morally corresponds to a dependent type which is punted to the deterministic fragment to correspond with it via subtyping. –  Kristopher Micinski Sep 30 '12 at 16:42

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