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I've got a couple of constructors for my class:

MyClass();
MyClass( int param1 );
MyClass( int param1, int param2 );
MyClass( std::string otherParam );
MyClass( std::string otherParam, int param1 );
MyClass( std::string otherParam, int param1, int param2 );

Now, there is some argument checking to be done in the constructor, e.g. -3 < param1 < 3. What's the preferred way of doing this check? Should I call checkParam1() and checkOtherParam() from each constructor?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In C++11 you can use a delegated constructor feature:

With the delegating constructors feature, you can concentrate common initializations and post initializations in one constructor named target constructor. Delegating constructors can call the target constructor to do the initialization. A delegating constructor can also be used as the target constructor of one or more delegating constructors. You can use this feature to make programs more readable and maintainable.

MyClass( std::string otherParam, int param1, int param2 );

MyClass( std::string otherParam, int param1)
:   MyClass(otherParam, param1, 456) {
}

The constructor with fewer parameters calls the constructor with more parameters, and the constructor with the most parameters does all the checking.

Note that you should be able to unify the last three constructors by adding default values for param1 and param2, like this:

MyClass( std::string otherParam, int param1 = 123, int param2 = 456);
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How do you explicitly call constructors in C++? –  krlmlr Sep 30 '12 at 17:57
    
In MyClass.cc, I get this error: MyClass.cc: In constructor ‘MyClass::MyClass(int, int)’: MyClass.cc:8:3: error: expected identifier before ‘this’ MyClass.cc:8:3: error: expected ‘{’ before ‘this’. Lines 8-10 are: MyClass::MyClass( int param1_, int param2_ ) :this( "", param1_, param2_ ) {}. Do you know what I could have gotten wrong? –  Andreas Sep 30 '12 at 18:10
    
@Andreas I'm sorry, I've been programming in C# for too long, I forgot the syntax. I edited the answer once more. –  dasblinkenlight Sep 30 '12 at 18:45
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For C++03, you'll need a special function to check and set parameters. You can use several functions, here in the example I put one function that checks all parameters.

void checkSetParams(std::string p1, int p2, int otherP)
{
    // check params, and set object members...
}

And then, in your constructors:

MyClass(int p1)
{
    checkSetParams(default_string, p1, default_int);
}

MyClass(int p1, int p2, std::string str)
{
    checkSetParams(str, p1, p2);
}

And so on.

For C++11, you can use a delegating constructor:

MyClass(std::string otherParam)
: MyClass(otherParam, 42, 3)
{
}

For both versions of the standard: you can use default arguments in your constructor. It might solve a part of your problem, but you can still have "convenience" constructors:

MyClass( int param1 = 42, int param2 = 3);
MyClass( std::string otherParam, int param1 = 42, int param2 = 3);

Here, you'll need one of the solution proposed before.

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1  
It's written as MyClass(...) : MyClass(args) and is called a "delegating constructor". –  Xeo Sep 30 '12 at 18:27
    
Corrected, thanks. –  Synxis Sep 30 '12 at 18:28
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My personal preference, and what I always advice to others, is to pass to the member as much responsibility as possible. This includes range checking.

So instead of this error generating code:

   MyClass( int param1 ) : param1(param1), param2(0) 
   {
      if (param1 < 7 || param1 > 123) throw std::range_error("param1");
      if (param2 < 0 || param2 > 123) throw std::range_error("param2");

   }
   MyClass( int param1, int param2 ) : param1(param1), param2(param2) 
   {
      if (param1 <= 8 || param1 > 123) throw std::range_error("param1");
      if (param2 <= 0 || param2 > 123) throw std::range_error("param2");
   }

I prefer range definition at member level:

template <class T, T range_min, T range_max>
struct Range_Type : Wrapper_Type<T> { // Wrapper_Type<T> stores value and emulates T 
  Range_Type(T value, const char* name) : Wrapper_Type<T>(value) {
     if (value < range_min || value > range_max) throw std::range_error(name);
  }
};

And usage:

  class MyClass{
  public:
       MyClass( int param1 ) : param1(param1), param2(0) 
       {
       }
       MyClass( int param1, int param2 ) : param1(param1), param2(param2) 
       {
       }
  private:
       Range_Type<int, 7, 123> param1;
       Range_Type<int, 0, 123> param1;
  };
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