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I have a function as follow:

int doSomething(long numLoop,long arraySize){
    int * buffer;
    buffer = (int*) malloc (arraySize * sizeof(int));
    long k;
int i;

    for (i=0;i<arraySize;i++)           
    buffer[i]=2;//write to make sure memory is allocated
    //start reading from cache
    for(k=0;k<numLoop;k++){
        int i;
        int temp
        for (i=0;i<arraySize;i++)           
        temp = buffer[i];
    }
}

What it do is to declare an array and read from the beginning to the end. The purpose is to see the effect of cache. What I expect to see is: when I call doSomething(10000,1000), the arraySize is small so it is all stored in the cache. After that I call doSomething(100,100000), the arraySize is bigger than that of the cache. As a result, the 2nd function call should take longer than the 1st one. The latter function call involved in some memory access as the whole array cannot be stored in the cache. However, it seems that the 2nd operation takes approximately the same time as the 1st one. So what's wrong here? I tried to compile with -O0 and it doesnt solve the problem. Thank you.

Update 1: these are the code with random access and it seems to work, time access with large array is ~15s while small array is ~3s

int doSomething(long numLoop,int a, long arraySize){
    int * buffer;
    buffer = (int*) malloc (arraySize * sizeof(int));
    long k;
    int i;

    for (i=0;i<arraySize;i++)           
        buffer[i]=2;//write to make sure memory is allocated
    //start reading from cache
    for(k=0;k<numLoop;k++){
        int temp;
            for (i=0;i<arraySize;i++){
                long randnum = rand();//max is 32767
                randnum = (randnum <<16) | rand();
                if (randnum < 0) randnum = -randnum;
                randnum%=arraySize;
                temp = buffer[randnum];
            }
    }
}
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This question is very similar to stackoverflow.com/q/12548651/841108 –  Basile Starynkevitch Sep 30 '12 at 18:05
    
Considering that your are initiliazing your buffer in a for() loop, obvioulsy the bigger the array is, the longer it takes to initiliaze the buffer. I think you are totally misleaded. –  Alexandre Vinçon Sep 30 '12 at 18:50
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are accessing the array in sequence,

for (i=0;i<arraySize;i++)           
    temp = buffer[i];

so the part you are accessing will always be in the cache since that pattern is trivial to predict. To see a cache-effect, you must access the array in a less predictable order, for example by generating (pseudo)random indices, so that you jump between the fron and the back of the array.

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hi, I have edited the function a bit. The write operations is moved upward. Please check it again, thanks! –  boh Sep 30 '12 at 18:05
    
Doesn't change anything, you're still accessing the array in sequence. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 30 '12 at 18:14
    
Please check update1. It worked! Thank you. –  boh Sep 30 '12 at 18:29
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In addition to the other answers: Your code accesses the memory sequentially. Let's assume that the cache line is 32 bytes. That means that you probably get a cache miss on every 8 access. So, picking a random index you should make it at least 32 bytes far from the previous value

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thanks but I think the 1/8 miss rate is good enough right? Anw, the update1 will solve this problem, as the access is totally random. –  boh Sep 30 '12 at 18:38
    
What for? to determine the size of cache? Or to determine for hit/miss rate? You need to find a point when every next read causes a read miss. –  Serge Sep 30 '12 at 18:40
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In order to measure the effect across multiple calls, you must use the same buffer (with the expectation that the first time through you are loading the cache, and the next time you are using it). In your case, you are allocating a new buffer for every call. (Additionally, you are never freeing your allocation.)

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Please check the code again, the write operations is moved and it is not repeated. The results seem to remain the same. –  boh Sep 30 '12 at 18:08
    
Please read my response :) I was not addressing your write operation but rather your lack of using the same buffer from one call to the next. –  mah Sep 30 '12 at 18:10
    
hmm, I get what you mean now but don't know how to fix the code. How can I make sure I am using the same cache? –  boh Sep 30 '12 at 18:32
    
I would suggest adding a 3rd parameter, int **pbuffer, removing your local buffer, and modifying the code to if (*pbuffer == NULL) *pbuffer = malloc(...);. Call the function the first time with: int *buffer = NULL; x = doSomething(..., ..., &pbuffer);, and future calls do not set the buffer address to NULL (so doSomething re-uses the buffer). –  mah Sep 30 '12 at 20:34
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