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I'm using the following code to unzip a dictionary and count the values at each site:

result = [Counter(site) for site in zip(*myDict.values())]

The output looks something like: Counter({'A': 74}), Counter({'G': 72, 'C': 2}) There are five possible values: A, T, G, C, and N

I only want the counter to spit out a value if one of the five values is less than 74. So for the above example, only the second would be outputted. How do you use an if statement within the counter? Furthermore, how can I label each site, so that above it could just say:

Site 2: 'G': 72, 'C': 2

myDict looks like this:

{'abc123': ATGGAGGACGACT, 'def332': ATGCATTGACGC}

Except there are 74 entries. Each value is the same length. Basically, I don't know how to use a counter that can give me an output for when each site of each value doesn't match up. So for the sequences above, the 4th site does not match. I want the counter to output the following:

site 4: 'G': 1, 'C': 1
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2  
What did you try? –  agf Sep 30 '12 at 18:08
    
I tried for site in zip(*myDict.values()): if Counter(site) < 74: Counter(site) = result[] –  user1647556 Sep 30 '12 at 18:12
1  
What does myDict look like? –  Mark Tolonen Sep 30 '12 at 18:13
1  
please clarify your question. –  Nicoretti Sep 30 '12 at 18:14
    
@MarkTolonen, I just edited the question to add myDict and tried to clarify. –  user1647556 Sep 30 '12 at 18:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use enumerate to index the sites and the most_common method on Counter can be used to check if the count is < 74. Here's an example with just two strings:

from collections import Counter
myDict = {'a':'ATGTTCN','b':'ATTTCCG'}
result = [(i,Counter(site)) for i,site in enumerate(zip(*myDict.values()))]
result = [x for x in result if x[1].most_common()[0][1] < 2]
for site,count in result:
    print 'Site {}: {}'.format(site,str(count)[9:-2])

Output:

Site 2: 'T': 1, 'G': 1
Site 4: 'C': 1, 'T': 1
Site 6: 'G': 1, 'N': 1
share|improve this answer
    
When we use i,site, where is the i coming from? –  user1647556 Sep 30 '12 at 18:29
    
enumerate returns a tuple of (index,value). I added links to documentation for the methods used. –  Mark Tolonen Sep 30 '12 at 18:31

using Dict Comprehension and only storing values if max(Counter(x).values())<74, use enumerate() to get the Site number.

>>> mydict={'abc123': 'ATGGAGGACGACT', 'def332': 'ATGCATTGACGC'}
>>> result={'Site {}'.format(i+1):Counter(x) for i,x in enumerate(zip(*mydict.values())) if max(Counter(x).values())<2}
>>> result
{'Site 7': Counter({'T': 1, 'G': 1}), 'Site 6': Counter({'T': 1, 'G': 1}), 'Site 4': Counter({'C': 1, 'G': 1}), 'Site 9': Counter({'A': 1, 'C': 1}), 'Site 8': Counter({'A': 1, 'G': 1}), 'Site 11': Counter({'A': 1, 'G': 1}), 'Site 10': Counter({'C': 1, 'G': 1})}

or convert Counter to dict:

>>> {'Site {}'.format(i+1):dict(Counter(x)) for i,x in enumerate(zip(*mydict.values())) if max(Counter(x).values())<2}

{'Site 7': {'T': 1, 'G': 1}, 'Site 6': {'T': 1, 'G': 1}, 'Site 4': {'C': 1, 'G': 1}, 'Site 9': {'A': 1, 'C': 1}, 'Site 8': {'A': 1, 'G': 1}, 'Site 11': {'A': 1, 'G': 1}, 'Site 10': {'C': 1, 'G': 1}}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you can do it in one line, but it computes the Counter object twice as many times. –  Mark Tolonen Sep 30 '12 at 18:35
    
@MarkTolonen Yes that's true, but your solution also uses two list comprehensions. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Sep 30 '12 at 18:39
    
It was slightly faster that way (verified with timeit, although after the fact :^) ) –  Mark Tolonen Sep 30 '12 at 19:10

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