Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a simple program that calls getpwnam() on a username, passes that username to a function, and then calls getpwnam() again. For some reason, I always get the passwd information for root inside the function.

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <pwd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void printuser(char *username) {
  printf("USERNAME2: %s\n", username);
  struct passwd *user_info = getpwnam(username);
  printf("USERNAME3: %s\n", username);
  printf("USERNAME4: %s\n", user_info->pw_name);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
  struct passwd *user_info = getpwnam(argv[1]);
  printf("USERNAME1: %s\n", user_info->pw_name);
  printuser(user_info->pw_name);
  printf("USERNAME5: %s\n", user_info->pw_name);
}

The program always produces the following output:

$ ./test_getpwnam chenxiaolong
USERNAME1: chenxiaolong
USERNAME2: chenxiaolong
USERNAME3: root
USERNAME4: root
USERNAME5: root

I can't find anything in the man page related to this. Is there something I'm doing wrong?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The return value may point to a static area which is overwritten by a subsequent call to getpwent(), getpwnam(), or getpwuid().

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/getpwnam.html

In particular, there is no guarantee about the ordering of reads/writes, so it is not safe to pass data returned from getpwnam back to getpwnam.

You really should not use getpwnam at all; use getpwnam_r instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot! I should have read the man page more carefully :) –  Xiao-Long Chen Sep 30 '12 at 20:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.