Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble setting up a cross compiler (Sourcery Codebench) and simulator (OVP) on my machine. Could someone please show me how to do this?

I'd like to cross compile C to MIPS and then simulate it on my windows 7 x86-64bit machine. I don't have a lot of experience with this kind of thing and am having trouble even figuring out which versions to download

I have seen one or 2 other questions about getting sourcery to work on windows, but they didn't have the information I need.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am not familiar with OVP, but I do know Sourcery CodeBench. Sourcery CodeBench is available for Windows and comes in an easy to use installer. The lite edition pages are here:

http://www.mentor.com/embedded-software/sourcery-tools/sourcery-codebench/editions/lite-edition/

There are links for MIPS ELF (Bare Metal) and GNU/Linux lite edition downloads. I'm not sure which one you need. The most recent toolchains are from the Spring 2012 release.

Once you have installed the toolchain, you can compile your application and run it on real hardware or on a simulator.

How far did you get? Did you install the toolchain and simulator? Can you compile and run the application on your target?

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Ricardo. Sorry for the late reply, I've been away from a reliable connection for a while. Uh... I haven't gotten very far at all. My current problem is I don't quite understand what the difference between the 2 editions are; and hence, which I should download. I have been told that the simulator boots into linux, which I gather means that it's a VM (kindda?) running a linux OS on a simulated MIPS archi. Does this mean I should download the GNU/Linux edition of SCB? I have been trying various combinations out, but nothing's working. Not sure if wrong combi or other reasons. –  C.E.Sally Oct 6 '12 at 17:30
    
Typically, bare metal toolchains like the MIPS ELF version of lite edition are intended for highly resource constrained microcontroller systems with no operating system, a simple executive or an RTOS. It sounds like you are developing a Linux application so you should use the MIPS GNU/Linux version of the toolchain. –  Ricardo Anguiano Nov 21 '12 at 17:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.