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Right now I am currently just doing this:

self.response.headers['Content-Type'] = 'application/json'
self.response.out.write('{"success": "some var", "payload": "some var"}')

Is there a better way to do it using some library?

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up vote 40 down vote accepted

Yes, you should use the json library that is supported in Python 2.7:

import json

self.response.headers['Content-Type'] = 'application/json'   
obj = {
    'success': 'some var', 
    'payload': 'some var',
  } 
self.response.out.write(json.dumps(obj))
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1  
Doh! I was using self.response.headers['Content-Type:'] = 'application/json' all the time and pulled my strin.. hairs. Accidentally added a colon there. – Jonny Sep 4 '13 at 1:42

webapp2 has a handy wrapper for the json module: it will use simplejson if available, or the json module from Python >= 2.6 if available, and as a last resource the django.utils.simplejson module on App Engine.

http://webapp-improved.appspot.com/api/webapp2_extras/json.html

from webapp2_extras import json

self.response.content_type = 'application/json'
obj = {
    'success': 'some var', 
    'payload': 'some var',
  } 
self.response.write(json.encode(obj))
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python itself has a json module, which will make sure that your JSON is properly formatted, handwritten JSON is more prone to get errors.

import json
self.response.headers['Content-Type'] = 'application/json'   
json.dump({"success":somevar,"payload":someothervar},self.response.out)
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1  
i might be wrong but i doubt this actually works this way. why would you pass self.response.out to the dump function as an argument? – aschmid00 Sep 30 '12 at 21:23
9  
It does work that way. self.response.out is a stream and dump() takes a stream as its second argument. (Maybe you're confused by the difference between dump() and dumps()?) – Guido van Rossum Oct 1 '12 at 1:18

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