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I'm becoming increasingly bewildered by the range of answers on offer to the seemingly simple problem of adding custom fields to the django-registration register form/flow. This should be a default, documented aspect of the package (not to sound ungrateful, just that it is such a well-equipped package), but solutions to the problem are dizzying.

Can anyone give me the most simple solution to getting UserProfile model data included in the default registration register page?

Update:

I eventually used Django Registration's own signals to give me this hacky fix. It is particularly ugly because, I had to use try on the POST attribute dealing with my Boolean since I found that the checkbox returned nothing if left empty.

Would appreciate any advice on improving this, or best practice.

My app / models.py

from registration.signals import user_registered
from django.dispatch import receiver

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User)
    event_commitments = models.ManyToManyField(Event, null=True, blank=True)
    receive_email = models.BooleanField(default=True)

@receiver(user_registered)
def registration_active_receive_email(sender, user, request, **kwargs):
    user_id = user.userprofile.id
    user = UserProfile.objects.get(pk=user_id)

    try:
        if request.POST['receive_email']:
            pass
    except:
        user.receive_email = False
        user.save()

Registration app / forms.py

class RegistrationForm(forms.Form):

    # default fields here, followed by my custom field below

    receive_email = forms.BooleanField(initial=True, required=False)

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
What are some of those solutions you've seen? Have you tried them? Why didn't they work? –  dokkaebi Oct 1 '12 at 7:14
    
I'd like to go through them all for the sake of StackOverflow, but it was hard enough trying and failing repeatedly, so would rather not document the failure. I sort of think a framework designed to help people get the standard stuff done quickly should have clear documentation about something like this. I'm surprised Django didn't have an well flagged resource on this. Maybe I'll make one. Any thoughts on what I eventually did (in the edit above)? Thanks –  KindOfGuy Oct 4 '12 at 14:59
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2 Answers 2

What you have looks like a workable approach.

I've looked through the django-registration code, and based on the following comments in the register view I've come up with another solution. I'm not totally sure this is cleaner, but if you aren't a fan of signals this is good. This also provides a much easier avenue if you intend to make more customizations.

# from registration.views.register:
"""
...
2. The form to use for account registration will be obtained by
   calling the backend's ``get_form_class()`` method, passing the
   ``HttpRequest``. To override this, see the list of optional
   arguments for this view (below).

3. If valid, the form's ``cleaned_data`` will be passed (as
   keyword arguments, and along with the ``HttpRequest``) to the
   backend's ``register()`` method, which should return the new
   ``User`` object.
...
"""

You could create a custom backend and override those mentioned methods:

# extend the provided form to get those fields and the validation for free
class CustomRegistrationForm(registration.forms.RegistrationForm):
    receive_email = forms.BooleanField(initial=True, required=False)

# again, extend the default backend to get most of the functionality for free
class RegistrationBackend(registration.backends.default.DefaultBackend):

    # provide your custom form to the registration view
    def get_form_class(self, request):
        return CustomRegistrationForm

    # replace what you're doing in the signal handler here
    def register(self, request, **kwargs):
        new_user = super(RegistrationBackend, self).register(request, **kwargs)
        # do your profile stuff here
        # the form's cleaned_data is available as kwargs to this method
        profile = new_user.userprofile
        # use .get as a more concise alternative to try/except around [] access
        profile.receive_email = kwargs.get('receive_email', False)
        profile.save()
        return new_user

To use the custom backend, you can then provide separate urls. Before including the default urls, write 2 confs that point at your custom backend. Urls are tested in the order defined, so if you define these two before including the defaults, these two will capture before the default ones are tested.

url(r'^accounts/activate/(?P<activation_key>\w+)/$',
    activate,
    {'backend': 'my.app.RegistrationBackend'},
    name='registration_activate'),
url(r'^accounts/register/$',
    register,
    {'backend': 'my.app.RegistrationBackend'},
    name='registration_register'),

url(r'^accounts/', include('registration.backends.default.urls')),

The docs actually describe all this, but they aren't particularly accessible (no readthedocs). They are all included in the project, and I was browsing them here.

share|improve this answer
    
That's clear. Why would you not want to use signals? Is it to keep apps decoupled? Also, I mentioned that I get no request.POST variable at all from the unchecked form checkbox, although I do get it when it is checked. Do you know why this might be? Thanks for your input! –  KindOfGuy Oct 4 '12 at 22:38
1  
An unchecked checkbox is a null value, and such values are totally omitted when serialized as form data. You'll also see missing fields for empty text inputs and empty radio groups. The second param to dict.get is a default, which will be returned if the key is absent. –  dokkaebi Oct 4 '12 at 23:32
1  
As for signals, I wouldn't particularly avoid them. You mentioned signals in the same sentence as 'hacky fix', so I originally thought you might generally dislike them. On rereading that, I see you didn't imply that. Generally, signals are actually useful for decoupling apps -- it's a great way for your invoices.Invoice model to take care of something when a User is saved without filling auth.User's save method with code related to another app. –  dokkaebi Oct 4 '12 at 23:35
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I eventually used Django Registration's own signals to give me this fix.

I will clean up the try/except flow at some point. dokkaebi also points out above that I might be able to assess the request.GET parameters for when a checkbox is left empty.

My app / models.py

from registration.signals import user_registered
from django.dispatch import receiver

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    user = models.OneToOneField(User)
    event_commitments = models.ManyToManyField(Event, null=True, blank=True)
    receive_email = models.BooleanField(default=True)

@receiver(user_registered)
def registration_active_receive_email(sender, user, request, **kwargs):
    user_id = user.userprofile.id
    user = UserProfile.objects.get(pk=user_id)

    try:
        if request.POST['receive_email']:
            pass
    except:
        user.receive_email = False
        user.save()

Registration app / forms.py

class RegistrationForm(forms.Form):

    # default fields here, followed by my custom field below

    receive_email = forms.BooleanField(initial=True, required=False)
share|improve this answer
    
user_id = user.userprofile.id hello may I know what is this userprofile you have declared? –  laycat Jun 25 '13 at 7:21
    
Its a default Django auth field, so an attribute of the standard user model: docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/auth/default/#user-objects –  KindOfGuy Jun 25 '13 at 8:18
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