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I'm writing a prolog program that will check if two math expressions are actually the same. For example, if my math expression goal is: (a + b) + c then any of the following expressions are considered the same:

(a+b)+c

a+(b+c)

(b+a)+c

(c+a)+b

a+(c+b)

c+(a+b)

and other combinations

Certainly, I don't expect to check the combination of possible answers because the expression can be more complex than that.

Currently, this is my approach: For example, if I want to check if a + b *c is the same with another expression such as c*b+a, then I store both expression recursively as binary expressions, and I should create a rule such as ValueOf that will give me the "value" of the first expression and the second expression. Then I just check if the "value" of both expression are the same, then I can say that both expression are the same. Problem is, because the content of the expression is not number, but identifier, I cannot use the prolog "is" keyword to get the value.

Any suggestion?

many thanks

% represent a + b * c
binExprID(binEx1).
hasLeftArg(binEx1, a).
hasRightArg(binEx1, binEx2).
hasOperator(binEx1, +).

binExprID(binEx2).
hasLeftArg(binEx2, b).
hasRightArg(binEx2, c).
hasOperator(binEx2, *).

% represent c * b + a
binExprID(binEx3).
hasLeftArg(binEx3, c).
hasRightArg(binEx3, b).
hasOperator(binEx3, *).

binExprID(binEx4).
hasLeftArg(binEx4, binEx3).
hasRightArg(binEx4, a).
hasOperator(binEx4, +).

goal:- valueOf(binEx1, V),
       valueOf(binEx4, V).
share|improve this question
    
Can you provide several examples so we can figure out how hard your problem could be. :) –  Guy Coder Oct 1 '12 at 0:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Math expressions can be very complex, I presume you are referring to arithmetic instead. The normal form (I hope my wording is appropriate) is 'sum of monomials'.

Anyway, it's not an easy task to solve generally, and there is an ambiguity in your request: 2 expressions can be syntactically different (i.e. their syntax tree differ) but still have the same value. Obviously this is due to operations that leave unchanged the value, like adding/subtracting 0.

From your description, I presume that you are interested in 'evaluated' identity. Then you could normalize both expressions, before comparing for equality.

To evaluate syntactical identity, I would remove all parenthesis, 'distributing' factors over addends. The expression become a list of multiplicative terms. Essentially, we get a list of list, that can be sorted without changing the 'value'.

After the expression has been flattened, all multiplicative constants must be accumulated.

a simplified example:

a+(b+c)*5 will be [[1,a],[b,5],[c,5]] while a+5*(c+b) will be [[1,a],[5,c],[5,b]]

edit after some improvement, here is a very essential normalization procedure:

:- [library(apply)].

arith_equivalence(E1, E2) :-
    normalize(E1, N),
    normalize(E2, N).

normalize(E, N) :-
    distribute(E, D),
    sortex(D, N).

distribute(A, [[1, A]]) :- atom(A).
distribute(N, [[1, N]]) :- number(N).
distribute(X * Y, L) :-
    distribute(X, Xn),
    distribute(Y, Yn),
    % distribute over factors
    findall(Mono, (member(Xm, Xn), member(Ym, Yn), append(Xm, Ym, Mono)), L).
distribute(X + Y, L) :-
    distribute(X, Xn),
    distribute(Y, Yn),
    append(Xn, Yn, L).

sortex(L, R) :-
    maplist(msort, L, T),
    maplist(accum, T, A),
    sumeqfac(A, Z),
    exclude(zero, Z, S),
    msort(S, R).

accum(T2, [Total|Symbols]) :-
    include(number, T2, Numbers),
    foldl(mul, Numbers, 1, Total),
    exclude(number, T2, Symbols).

sumeqfac([[N|F]|Fs], S) :-
    select([M|F], Fs, Rs),
    X is N+M,
    !, sumeqfac([[X|F]|Rs], S).
sumeqfac([F|Fs], [F|Rs]) :-
    sumeqfac(Fs, Rs).
sumeqfac([], []).

zero([0|_]).
mul(X, Y, Z) :- Z is X * Y.

Some test:

?- arith_equivalence(a+(b+c), (a+c)+b).
true .

?- arith_equivalence(a+b*c+0*77, c*b+a*1).
true .

?- arith_equivalence(a+a+a, a*3).
true .

I've used some SWI-Prolog builtin, like include/3, exclude/3, foldl/5, and msort/2 to avoid losing duplicates.

These are basic list manipulation builtins, easily implemented if your system doesn't have them.

edit

foldl/4 as defined in SWI-Prolog apply.pl:

:- meta_predicate
    foldl(3, +, +, -).

foldl(Goal, List, V0, V) :-
    foldl_(List, Goal, V0, V).

foldl_([], _, V, V).
foldl_([H|T], Goal, V0, V) :-
    call(Goal, H, V0, V1),
    foldl_(T, Goal, V1, V).

handling division

Division introduces some complexity, but this should be expected. After all, it introduces a full class of numbers: rationals.

Here are the modified predicates, but I think that the code will need much more debug. So I allegate also the 'unit test' of what this micro rewrite system can solve. Also note that I didn't introduce the negation by myself. I hope you can work out any required modification.

/*  File:    arith_equivalence.pl
    Author:  Carlo,,,
    Created: Oct  3 2012
    Purpose: answer to http://stackoverflow.com/q/12665359/874024
             How to check if two math expressions are the same?
         I warned that generalizing could be a though task :) See the edit.
*/

:- module(arith_equivalence,
      [arith_equivalence/2,
       normalize/2,
       distribute/2,
       sortex/2
      ]).

:- [library(apply)].

arith_equivalence(E1, E2) :-
    normalize(E1, N),
    normalize(E2, N), !.

normalize(E, N) :-
    distribute(E, D),
    sortex(D, N).

distribute(A, [[1, A]]) :- atom(A).
distribute(N, [[N]]) :- number(N).
distribute(X * Y, L) :-
    distribute(X, Xn),
    distribute(Y, Yn),
    % distribute over factors
    findall(Mono, (member(Xm, Xn), member(Ym, Yn), append(Xm, Ym, Mono)), L).
distribute(X / Y, L) :-
    normalize(X, Xn),
    normalize(Y, Yn),
    divide(Xn, Yn, L).
distribute(X + Y, L) :-
    distribute(X, Xn),
    distribute(Y, Yn),
    append(Xn, Yn, L).

sortex(L, R) :-
    maplist(dsort, L, T),
    maplist(accum, T, A),
    sumeqfac(A, Z),
    exclude(zero, Z, S),
    msort(S, R).

dsort(L, S) :- is_list(L) -> msort(L, S) ; L = S.

divide([], _, []).
divide([N|Nr], D, [R|Rs]) :-
    (   N = [Nn|Ns],
        D = [[Dn|Ds]]
    ->  Q is Nn/Dn,  % denominator is monomial
        remove_common(Ns, Ds, Ar, Br),
        (   Br = []
        ->  R = [Q|Ar]
        ;   R =  [Q|Ar]/[1|Br]
        )
    ;   R = [N/D]    % no simplification available
    ),
    divide(Nr, D, Rs).

remove_common(As, [], As, []) :- !.
remove_common([], Bs, [], Bs).
remove_common([A|As], Bs, Ar, Br) :-
    select(A, Bs, Bt),
    !, remove_common(As, Bt, Ar, Br).
remove_common([A|As], Bs, [A|Ar], Br) :-
    remove_common(As, Bs, Ar, Br).

accum(T, [Total|Symbols]) :-
    partition(number, T, Numbers, Symbols),
    foldl(mul, Numbers, 1, Total), !.
accum(T, T).

sumeqfac([[N|F]|Fs], S) :-
    select([M|F], Fs, Rs),
    X is N+M,
    !, sumeqfac([[X|F]|Rs], S).
sumeqfac([F|Fs], [F|Rs]) :-
    sumeqfac(Fs, Rs).
sumeqfac([], []).

zero([0|_]).
mul(X, Y, Z) :- Z is X * Y.

:- begin_tests(arith_equivalence).

test(1) :-
    arith_equivalence(a+(b+c), (a+c)+b).

test(2) :-
    arith_equivalence(a+b*c+0*77, c*b+a*1).

test(3) :-
    arith_equivalence(a+a+a, a*3).

test(4) :-
    arith_equivalence((1+1)/x, 2/x).

test(5) :-
    arith_equivalence(1/x+1, (1+x)/x).

test(6) :-
    arith_equivalence((x+a)/(x*x), 1/x + a/(x*x)).

:- end_tests(arith_equivalence).

running the unit test:

?- run_tests(arith_equivalence).
% PL-Unit: arith_equivalence ...... done
% All 6 tests passed
true.
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Chac, Thanks for the answer. It looks like that this is the one that I need. Unfortunately, when I run it in my SWI-prolog, it told me: Undefined procedure: foldl/4. In your note, you said that you used foldl/5 not foldl/4, but in the code it is foldl/4. So, is there any argument missing from the foldl? Thanks –  Budi Hartanto Oct 2 '12 at 7:09
    
foldl/4 is right, sorry for the typo. It's strange that it miss from your installation. I'll paste the very simple definition in the answer... –  CapelliC Oct 2 '12 at 7:27
    
Hi Chac, It works correctly now. Many thanks for that. Now, it's time for me to understand, how actually the code works. Again, many thanks for this. –  Budi Hartanto Oct 2 '12 at 7:50
    
I'm glad you will try it. At least you will need to handle sign in normalization. Keep as simple as possible (multiplication by literal -1 should work). –  CapelliC Oct 2 '12 at 8:07
    
This is a fantastic answer and also a great example of what makes Prolog unique. –  Daniel Lyons Oct 2 '12 at 17:50

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