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I have an image I'd like to show in a browser such that:

  1. If the image is smaller than the browser viewport, the image is centered horizotally and vertically.
  2. If the image is larger than the viewport, the image is scaled down to fill as much of the viewport as possible without adjusting the aspect ratio of the image. Again, the image is centered horizotally and vertically.

I do not want to use JavaScript; what's the best/most semantic HTML and CSS to do this?

Update I've been asked for clarification regarding semantics: the image is content; the only content within the HTML.

Solution

@GionaF ideas got me to a happy (and very simple) solution:

HTML

<!DOCTYPE html>
<head>
  <title></title>
  <LINK href="test2.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css">
</head>
<body>
    <div>
      <img src="photo.jpg" alt="photo" />
    </div>
</body>

CSS

img {
    max-width:100%;
    max-height:100%;
    position:absolute;
    top:0; left:0; right:0; bottom:0;
    margin:auto;
}
share|improve this question
1  
without JavaScript? not possible if you don't know the height and/or width of the image –  Mark Sep 30 '12 at 22:35
1  
CSS is not made to handle if conditions. It does exactly what you tell it to do. –  Blender Sep 30 '12 at 23:52
    
It is possible. Just need workarounds for IE8 and below. –  Giona Oct 1 '12 at 0:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can achieve it in many ways, but i can't be "semantic" without knowing the context (is the image the main/only content of the page? is it in the middle of a blog post?), so i'll go for a div.


1. position:absolute; + margin:auto;

Support: crossbrowser

HTML

<html>
<body>
    <div id="container">
        <img src="your-image.jpg">
    </div>
</body>
</html>​

CSS

html,body,#container {
    height:100%;
}
#container {
    width:100%;
    position:relative;
}
#container > img {
    width:100%;
    max-width:400px; /* real image width */
    position:absolute;
    top:0; left:0; right:0; bottom:0;
    margin:auto;
}

Demo


2. display:table; + display:table-cell; + vertical-align:middle;

Support: IE8+, all other browsers - with IE7 fallback (Source 1) (2) (3)

HTML

<html>
<body>
    <div id="container">
        <span> /* it's important that you use a span here
                  not a div, or the IE7 fallback won't work */
            <img src="your-image.jpg">
        </span>
    </div>
</body>
</html>​

CSS

html,body,#container {
    height:100%;
}
#container {
    width:100%;
    display:table;
    *display:block; /* IE7 */
}
#container > span {
    display:table-cell;
    *display:inline-block; /* IE7 */
    vertical-align:middle;
    text-align:center;
}
#container > span > img {
    width:100%;
    max-width:400px; /* real image width */
}

Demo


3. background-size:contain;

Support: IE9+, all other browsers - with vendor prefixes (Source 1) (2)

HTML

<html>
<body>
    <div id="container"></div>
</body>
</html>​

CSS

html,body,#container {
    height:100%;
}
#container {
    margin:0 auto;
    max-width:400px; /* real image width */
    background:url(your-image.jpg) 50% 50% no-repeat;
    background-size:contain;
}

Demo


Be careful for how IE8 renders height:auto;, may not keep the ratio.


Edit: i just realized that you wrote "without adjusting the aspect ratio of the image". If you really don't want to keep the ratio, it's easier ... but do you really mean that? 

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for these - I am going to try them out. I do want to maintain the aspect ratio. Re: semantics - the image is content, the only content on the page. –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 12:12
    
@Mike well then, a div will be ok ;-) if them doesn't work, please add your full page code. –  Giona Oct 1 '12 at 13:57
    
Thanks for your help: got me close enough to the solution which I have now added to the question. –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 21:57

You won't be able to accomplish this unless you have a set height for the container that houses the image. In order for the viewport to know where to have the image centered, it will need know the full height you are working with, as opposed to staying the same size as the image. Height will only expand if it is told to, or if there is actual content filling it up.

To center horizontally you will need to set a container around the image and give it a margin of '0, auto'. Set the image width to be 100% within the container (this will keep the proportions correct as the height will scale appropriately with it), and give the container a percentage based width as well.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the comment. I'll never know the size of the image or the size of the viewport ahead of time ... so you're saying it's not possible? –  Mike Sep 30 '12 at 22:25
1  
Correct, at least not the vertical aspect. Width is no problem with browsers, but you really need to have specifics for vertical height, or content filling a space, otherwise the browser truncates it down. JS does offer solutions for this, but if you want just CSS and HTML, you'll need to give it more information on the size of the content. –  schoenburg Sep 30 '12 at 22:34
    
FYI - I think I have accomplished it; see latest revision to the question. –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 21:58

You will need to give your image or surround div a set width and height for margin: auto to center the image. See how the code below works for you.

Css

#container {
width: 1000px;
height: 1000px;
}

#img {
    background-color:#000;
width: 100px;
height: 100px;
margin: 0 auto;
}​

HTML

<div id="container">

<div id="img">

</div>

Edit

Set image as background? Then set the body to 100%.

body
{
    background-image: url('background.jpg');
    background-repeat: no-repeat; /* you know... don't repeat... */
    background-position: center center; /*center the background */
    background-attachment: fixed; /*don't scroll with content */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but won't this just always render a 100x100px image? –  Mike Sep 30 '12 at 22:23
    
Yes I was just using that as an example. Could you set the image as a background? I've edited the above –  Michael Sep 30 '12 at 22:29
    
Thanks Michael - this looks like a good second choice if my preferred solution turns out to have a yet unseen issue. –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 21:59

I wasn't able to find a perfect solution (from what I've read it's not possible to do what you want using only CSS and HTML). But I've found a solution closer to what you need. I repeat, it's not perfect. So here it goes (you actually put your image as a background for a div):

#mydiv {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    position: relative;
    background-image: url(photo.jpg);
    background-position: center;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-size: auto 98%, cover;
}

So, the key here is the background-size property. What it does here: force the image to scale (up or down) to a specified percentage of the width/height of the div/container (the width and height of the div is dictated by the viewport). For images bigger than viewport, this solution is good, but the problem is with smaller images (which are scaled up). Unfortunely, the current implementation of CSS doesn't permit to specify a max-height or max-width for the background-image. If you want to read more on this subject open this webpage: http://www.css3.info/preview/background-size/.

Anyway, a JavaScript solution is better. Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks CodeNighter - this looks like a good second choice if my preferred solution turns out to have a yet unseen issue. –  Mike Oct 1 '12 at 21:59

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