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When you are developing an architecture in OO/DDD style and modeling some domain entity e.g. Order entity you are putting whole logic related to order into Order entity. But when the application becomes more complicated, Order entity collects more and more logic and this class becomes really huge. Comparing with anemic model, yes its obviously an anti-pattern, but all that huge logic is separated in different services.

Is it ok to deal with huge domain entities or i understand something wrong?

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It's fine to use services in DDD. You will commonly see services at the Domain, Application or Infrastructure layers.

Eric uses these guidelines in his book for spotting when to use services:

  • The operation relates to a domain concept that is not a natural part of an ENTITY or VALUE OBJECT.
  • The interface is defined in terms of other elements in the domain model
  • The operation is stateless
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Can domain entity work with infrastructure layer? E.g. where to locate method SendByEmail() thats sends Order and changes its inner state? –  Iliya Garakh Oct 1 '12 at 8:40
    
It's usually best to break responsibilities down, so a SendEmail() method would be possibly be a responsibility of an OrderServices class in your Domain layer and should only send an email and nothing more. If you also require to mark the order as complete, this would probably be a call to CompleteOrder(), which may be okay to leave on your Order entity. It's all specific to your application and how things feel when you've run them round the block. You can then make a higher level (more abstract) Application Service like ProcessOrder() that might do many things in sequence. –  Adrian Thompson Phillips Oct 1 '12 at 9:08
    
Thanx, that got clear. One more question: what do people usually do with generated by ORM entity classes: extend them and use them in domain layer, or develop «pure» model which uses persistance layer which uses that generated classes etc? The second looks more «theoreticly» correct and allows to create much more poweful models but when you are working with small or medium size application that persistance layer would be just a wrapper for the orm? –  Iliya Garakh Oct 1 '12 at 11:36
    
Personally I use the later approach and only use the ORM entities inside the Repository classes. My repositories return (and accept) domain entities. Which although you don't feel to get full benefit of an ORM, it does save you from writing lots of CRUD operations. The two approaches you mention are usually a trade-off between long-term architectural goodness and small-scale rapid development. –  Adrian Thompson Phillips Oct 1 '12 at 14:35
    
Yeah, i thought the same. Thanks for the explanation –  Iliya Garakh Oct 1 '12 at 21:09
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When you are trying to create rich domain models, focus entities on identity and lifecyle, and thus try to avoid them becoming bloated with either properties or behavior.

Domain services potentially are a place to put behavior, but I tend to see a lot of domain service methods with behavior that would be better assigned to value objects, so I wouldn't start refactoring by moving the behavior to domain services. Domain services tend to work best as straightforward facades/adaptors in front of connections to things outside of the current domain model (i.e. masking infrastructure concerns).

You can also put behavior in Application services, but ask yourself whether that behavior belongs outside of the domain model or not. As a general rule, try to focus application services more on orchestration-style tasks that cross entities, domain services, repositories.

When you encounter a bloated entity then the first thing to do is look for sets of cohesive set of entity properties and related behavior, and make these implicit concepts explicit by extracting them into value objects. The entity can then delegate its behavior to these value objects.

Since we all tend to be more comfortable with entities, try to be more biased towards value objects so that you get the benefits of immutability, encapsulation and composability that value objects provide - moving you towards a more supple design.

Value objects enable you to incorporate a more functional style (eg. side-effect-free functions) into your domain model and thus free up your entities from having to deal with the complexity of adding complicated behavior to the burden of managing identity and lifecycle. See the pattern summaries for entities and value objects in Eric Evan's http://domainlanguage.com/ddd/patterns/ and the Blue Book for more details.

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When you are developing an architecture in OO/DDD style and modeling some domain entity e.g. Order entity you are putting whole logic related to order into Order entity. But when the application becomes more complicated, Order entity collects more and more logic and this class becomes really huge.

Classes that have a tendency to become huge, are often the classes with overlapping responsibilities. Order is a typical example of a class that could have multiple responsibilities and that could play different roles in your application.

Given the context the Order appears in, it might be an Entity with mutable state (i.e. if you're managing Order's commercial condition, during a negotiation phase) but if you're application is managing logistics, an Order might play a different role: and an immutable Value Object might be the best implementation in the logistic context.

Comparing with anemic model, yes its obviously an anti-pattern, but all that huge logic is separated in different services.

...and separation is a good thing. :-)

I have got a feeling that the original model is probably data-centric and data serving different purposes (order creation, payment, order fulfillment, order delivery) is piled up in the same container (the Order class). Can't really say it from here, but it's a very frequent pattern. Not all of this data is useful for the same purpose at the same time.

Often, a bloated class like the one you're describing is a smell of a missing separation between Bounded Contexts, and/or an incomplete Aggregate separation within the same bounded context. I'd have a look to:

  • things that change together;
  • things that change for the same reason;
  • information needed to fulfill behavior;

and try to re-define aggregate boundaries accordingly. And also to:

  • different purposes for the application;
  • different stakeholders;
  • different implicit models/languages;

when it comes to discover the involved contexts.

In a large application you might have more than one model, thus leading to more than a single representation of a single domain concept, at least for concepts that are playing many roles.

This is complementary to Paul's approach.

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