Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why do I get the following compiler error:

//error CS0159: No such label 'lbl_proc_20'

with the following code:

//JUST A DUMMY CODE TO ILLUSTRATE THE CONCEPT
int a = resultOfFunction1();
int b = resultOfFunction2();

//10+ Local variables that are calculated depending on the results above

if (a < 10)
{
    switch (b)
    {
        case 0:
            //Actions for A<10, B=0, using local variables
            break;
        case 1:
            double c = someFunction(a, b);  //In real code involves calculations based on a and b
            if(c > 10.0)
                goto lbl_proc_20;   //error CS0159: No such label 'lbl_proc_20' within the scope of the goto statement

                    //Actions for A<10, B=1, using local variables
            break;
        default:
            //Actions for A<10, B=Other, using local variables
            break;
    }
}
else if (a < 20)
{
lbl_proc_20:
    switch(b)
    {
        case 0:
            //Actions for A<20, B=0, using local variables
            break;
        case 1:
            //Actions for A<20, B=1, using local variables
            break;
        case 2:
            //Actions for A<20, B=2, using local variables
            break;
        default:
            //Actions for A<20, B=Other, using local variables
            break;
    }
}
else if (a < 30)
{
    switch(b)
    {
        case 0:
            //Actions for A<30, B=0, using local variables
            break;
        case 1:
            //Actions for A<30, B=1, using local variables
            break;
        case 2:
            //Actions for A<30, B=2, using local variables
            break;
        default:
            //Actions for A<30, B=Other, using local variables
            break;
    }
}

Why am I getting an error for a goto statement and how to make it work?

EDIT: Changed the sample to illustrate the actual code.

share|improve this question
    
I purged the comments here because they were just getting out of hand. Unless you folks can be constructive then just move along to something else. –  Kev Sep 30 '12 at 22:47
    
'goto' must be a new f'word in programming circles, hah :D –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 23:05
3  
@user843732 - Yes, for over 30 years. With good reasons and not just by Microsoft. –  Henk Holterman Sep 30 '12 at 23:13
    
@user843732 I would recommend reworking your code. There are only, very very very special cases where goto might be a choice. –  zezba9000 Oct 3 '12 at 23:47

3 Answers 3

You can only use goto to jump to labels within the scope of the goto. From the docs that describes error CS0159:

The label referenced by the goto statement could not be found within the scope of the goto statement.

Although the label exists, you can't jump out of an if block into an else block. The code within else is not the same scope as that that contains the goto.

It's time to restructure your code so it doesn't need goto.

Edit

You should try to simplify your logic. Multiple functions are preferable to goto statements.

One option you might want to consider is Windows Workflow Foundation. It's a really neat tool that lets you represent your logic visually as a flow chart. WWF will then generate the code necessary to handle the logic you specify. This might work for since it appears like you are creating some type of finite state machine or similar process.

share|improve this answer
1  
You want to show me how you'd restructure it without making a 10-function monster out of it? The code I posted is a diagram of an actual code I have. PS. Note that each 'switch' statement has 3 to 4 'case's and there're about 10 outer 'if's in a real code. –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 22:19
4  
@user843732: Not without knowing what your code is actually supposed to do. –  Chris Laplante Sep 30 '12 at 22:21
    
Updated the code to illustrate the "real" life scenario... –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 22:40
    
@user843732: Ok, I've added another option. Check out Windows Workflow Foundation. –  Chris Laplante Sep 30 '12 at 22:46
    
Thanks. But come one, all that so that not to use "goto" :))))))) –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 22:47

As a response to "How to do it without goto"

bool pretendA20 = false;

if (a < 10)
{
    switch (b)
    {
        case 0:
            //Actions for A<10, B=0, using local variables
            break;
        case 1:
            double c = someFunction(a, b);  //In real code involves calculations based on a and b
            if(c > 10.0)
            {
                //goto lbl_proc_20;   
                pretendA20 = true;
                break;
             }

             //Actions for A<10, B=1, using local variables

            break;
        default:
            //Actions for A<10, B=Other, using local variables
            break;
    }
}

if ((a >= 10 && a < 20) || pretendA20)
{
//lbl_proc_20:
    switch(b)
    {
share|improve this answer
    
All your 'if's, 'and's and 'pretend's will make my actual code totally unreadable. But, I guess, you'll stick with your opinion and I'll stick with mine... So far, I haven't heard a single argument over why 'goto' is bad. I understand that MS C# compiler fails to check variable scope with the use of 'goto', but that doesn't justify the "badness" of 'goto'. It simply means inability of MS to make good products. This whole thread was just one big name-calling, and an attempt to make my proposed code "more unreadable"... –  c00000fd Oct 1 '12 at 1:20

The C# language specification (chapter 8 on page 249) states:

If a label with the given name does not exist in the current function member, or if the goto statement is not within the scope of the label, a compile-time error occurs. This rule permits the use of a goto statement to transfer control out of a nested scope, but not into a nested scope.

In your case the label lbl_proc_20 is not in the same scope as the goto and you're trying to transfer control into another nested scope.

You can grab the language spec from here:

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=7029

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thank you. I got that. What I guess, I'm asking, is how to rewrite this with the least of involvement since 'goto' seems to be deemed bad by Microsoft (and everyone here took it as a gospel)? –  c00000fd Sep 30 '12 at 23:04
    
@Kev A title of a question does not always clearly represent its content in full context. The question had to do with how to optimize the IL code of .NET, either by writing better code as was my solution or by using a bytecode optimizer. The "issue" of the question was not to shop but rather to find a solution to my technical problem about IL code. Questions do not necessarily fully equate to the issue. Stackoverflow is about solving issues. Sorry about the bad choice of words on my part and I understand your position, but find it based on preconceptions. I apologize for the cud slang. –  zezba9000 Oct 3 '12 at 23:38
    
@zezba9000 - apologies accepted. I would advise asking about this on Meta Stack Overflow rather than discussing in the comments here. Thanks. –  Kev Oct 4 '12 at 0:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.