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I am thinking to use Silverlight instead of WPF as Client and WCF as server. Does it make sence?

I guess I will have these advantages:

1) More portable because it's Web.

2) I don't need to validate an user input in both client and server applications.

The third advantage is my main question: I guess the user cannot see my code, so my application would be safe against hackers. Is this correct? This means that if I store a database connection string in Silverlight, no clients will see it, right?

Thanks.

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More portable... between Windows computers –  Serge Sep 30 '12 at 22:33
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@Serge: No, it also runs on Macs (officially supported by MS) and Linux (to some degree with Moonlight). –  H.B. Sep 30 '12 at 22:36
    
@H.B. : on iOS ??? MacOS you mean. –  Henk Holterman Sep 30 '12 at 22:37
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@HenkHolterman: Err, whatever, those Apple computer thingies. –  H.B. Sep 30 '12 at 22:38
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@Serge: I would say that free software is ideologically preferable, but WPF and SL5 have been the greatest GUI frameworks i have programmed in so far. –  H.B. Sep 30 '12 at 22:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The .xap file in which your Silverlight Application is packaged is only an archive that contains the DLLs of your application (rename it to .zip and see for yourself) so your code can still be decompiled by anyone who downloads the .xap.

As for your 2nd point, you should validate on the server. I could, for example, sniff the traffic and see that your application calls a WCF web service. From there I could make my own requests to your service without using your application. If you don't validate server-side bad things will happen.

Also, the "portability" of Silverlight is arguable, but yes I guess it is more portable than a .exe.

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Thanks! I didn't know that! –  Seva Oct 1 '12 at 0:31

1) More portable because it's Web.

More portable : Yes, but limited to the SL reach.

2) I don't need to validate an user input in both client and server applications.

Validation: Always repeat client validation on the Server. Whatever you use on the Client, don't trust it.

I guess the user cannot see my code, so my application would be safe against hackers. Is this correct?

No, very much not so. Hackers can still inspect and disassemble your code.

This means that if I store a database connection string in Silverlight, no clients will see it, right?

No, per the above. But SilverLight has not much use for database connection strings anyway ...
SL does not have the ADO.NET libs afaik. Maybe that "SL Full Trust" can use them but I doubt it.

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Thanks! I didn't know that! –  Seva Oct 1 '12 at 0:31

1) More portable because it's Web.

Well you'd have to define what you meant by "web" here. It won't work (unless I've missed something) on iOS (using Safari), or Android devices, or probably some others. It's not "web" in the same way that, say, a pure HTML5 application is "web".

2) I don't need to validate an user input in both client and server applications.

That's only true if the server can "know" that the input really came from the client. If it's just a web request, it could be posted by anything. In my experience you should always validate on the server - client-side validation is there to make life easier for the user; server-side validation is to really enforce business rules.

The third advantage is my main question: I guess the user cannot see my code, so my application would be safe against hackers. Is this correct?

No. The code is running on the user's machine; it will have been downloaded, and can be decompiled like any other .NET assembly.

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@H.B.: Are you sure? Not MacOSX? I should have specified: "without installing a separate browser" - so I guess I really mean "in Safari on iOS" which is what the bulk of consumers would be using. Will edit that in. –  Jon Skeet Sep 30 '12 at 22:37
    
As noted on the question that is what i meant. Well, your main point stands in any case, it's a bit more portable but still not as much as HTML based applications. –  H.B. Sep 30 '12 at 22:43
    
Thanks! I didn't know that! –  Seva Oct 1 '12 at 0:33
    
I completely agree about "NOT-WEB".It uses client resources. Seeing a plugin in a browser does not mean its web. (Flash,java applets,silverlight are member of plug-in family.They all are detachable). Beside this with HTML approach mean supporting JS, its also another client side technology. Some browsers still does not support them or support by different way. HTML5 also uses client resources depending on JS . What can we say ? World keeps turning and everything getting complicated. In my opinion its not good coming for our resources; In a browser many pages,there are dozens of AJAX asking.. –  Davut Gürbüz Oct 2 '12 at 8:18

The assembly can easily be extracted and decompiled also you never can know that a request comes from your application if it runs on the client so do not even think about skipping server validation.

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Thanks! I didn't know that! –  Seva Oct 1 '12 at 0:32

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