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<input type="text"/> OR <input type="text">


<link rel="stylesheet" href="ss.css" type="text/css"/> OR <link rel="stylesheet" href="ss.css" type="text/css">


<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8"/> OR <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">

I MEAN > vs />

My Header HTML TYPE IS:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">

What is right for me?

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1  
Depends on the doctype. –  BalusC Sep 30 '12 at 22:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Alaa, you are using HTML 4.01 Strict. Closing so called "empty elements" (like input, meta, link, img, br, …) with a slash is not allowed in this DOCTYPE not encouraged for this DOCTYPE (but strictly speaking allowed, ↓ see comments to this answer).

So you have to should use <input type="text">.

The rules are different for other DOCTYPES: In XHTML you have to use the closing slash for empty elements. In HTML5 you are free to choose what you like more.

Validate your HTML document: http://validator.w3.org/ - you will see that your document produces errors a warning if you use <input type="text" />. Note that using <meta /> (in head) creates additionally an error, because of a side-effect (↓ see comments).

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The W3C Markup Validator does not report <input type="text" /> as an error. It issues a warning; this is a practical move intended to help people, but it is formally incorrect: saying “NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES” is wrong, because (pre-XHTML) HTML is defined with SHORTTAG YES: w3.org/TR/html401/sgml/sgmldecl.html –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 1 '12 at 2:47
    
@Jukka: when closing meta, I get a warning (the one you quoted) and an error: "character data is not allowed here: using XHTML-style self-closing tags (such as <meta ... />) in HTML 4.01 or earlier. To fix, remove the extra slash ('/') character." When closing input, only a warning. So there seems to be a difference? –  unor Oct 1 '12 at 5:28
    
the error message is something different and it is caused by not wrapping an input element in a block-level container when using a Strict DTD (as can be seen from the preceding error message “document type does not allow element "INPUT" here”). In formal terms, as explained in the document cited in the error message, <input type="text" /> is equivalent to <input type="text">> (i.e., an input tag followed by a greater-than sign), so when the context disallows character data, you get an error message. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 1 '12 at 6:35
    
@Jukka: Ah, I see. That's why <meta /> creates an error (becaue it's in head and character data is not allowed there). Thanks for your clarification ☺ –  unor Oct 1 '12 at 20:53

/> is right for XHTML > for HTML.

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@Alaa Gamal: You seriously asking that? –  BoltClock Oct 1 '12 at 1:58

The former is XHTML style, and the latter is HTML/SGML style. Most browsers will accept either.

The most recent HTML specification, HTML5, is not XHTML-based, so omitting the self-closing slash is idiomatic.

Edit: the doctype you have provided is for HTML4 Strict. Omitting the self-closing slash is probably most "correct", but either will work and which is preferred is a matter of taste.

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i am beginner in html, and i don't know which type is right for me, i've modified my question with more data, please see my html type –  Alaa Gamal Sep 30 '12 at 22:53
    
Ok but i did't know what should i use with this DocType? /> OR > –  Alaa Gamal Sep 30 '12 at 23:12
    
As I said, > is probably "correct". /> will still work, though, and some people prefer it. –  Jeremy Roman Sep 30 '12 at 23:15

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