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I've read around that instead of using instanceof and getClass methods to implement polymorphism, as it's better object-oriented practice.

If my program looks like the following:

Piece
SlowPiece extends Piece,
FastPiece extends Piece,
SlowFlexible extends SlowPiece,
FastFlexible extends FastPiece

And I have the following rule: SlowPiece's can only move one space, and FastPiece's as many as they'd like.

How would I use polymorphism to ensure that if I'm moving a Piece like Piece piece1 = new SlowPiece(); that it is not moved more than one?

I've got a class for the game-board, and it should be able to move the piece, but I'm not sure how to stop it from moving a SlowPiece more than 1 without code-sniffing.

Basically, I get how polymorphism is fantastic for say, listing things, but with actually interacting with them I don't get how to use it properly.

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1  
I would argue that a manual dispatch is never showing polymorphism (of any type), but .. –  user166390 Sep 30 '12 at 23:16
1  
In any case, why not just an int maximumNumberOfSpaces() { .. } method? Also, consider interfaces for contracts (subclassing is just an easy way to share behavior). –  user166390 Sep 30 '12 at 23:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Make Piece abstract and add an abstract method move() to Piece (you could also user an interface). Implement move() differently (a SlowPiece only moves 1 spot, etc).

public abstract class Piece {
    public abstract void move();
}

public class SlowPiece extends Piece {
    public void move() {
        System.out.println("moving a slow piece");
    }
}

public class FastPiece extends Piece {
    public void move() {
        System.out.println("moving a fast piece");
    }
}

Piece f = new FastPiece();
f.move();       

Piece s = new SlowPiece();
s.move();

Here, move() has all the moving logic; you could even use some overloads to allow for movement variety (like take N/S/W/E as arguments, etc).

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As the piece needs to have knowledge of the board, this isn't possible unless I pass the board each time, right? I need to make sure the move won't push it off the edge of the board (so I have to check the indices of the 2D-array) and make sure no other pieces currently occupy the space it intends to move to. I heavily considered this option, but I didn't see how I could get it to move if I didn't have any knowledge of where else on the board it could move to. –  Doug Smith Oct 1 '12 at 0:00
    
You should probably make all the Pieces elements of a Game object (which, in turn, also contains a Board object) to allow cross-access. Again, this is just one pattern, but to me it seems intuitive. –  David Titarenco Oct 1 '12 at 1:59
    
If you don't want to use a larger object (that may grow into a God object), use dependency injection (which is another pattern). –  David Titarenco Oct 1 '12 at 4:02

As another consideration to this problem, let's understand the basic overall concept.

  • A Piece can move().
  • Certain types of Piece move() in a different manner than others.

One can declare Piece as an interface, and have all other Pieces implement this. This way, you're guaranteeing that every Piece has a move(), and also forcing you to ensure that every move() is distinct, depending on the Piece.

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Another way is to make the Piece an abstract class. This would be more easy if there are other common methods and prevents you to code the common ones only ones –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Sep 30 '12 at 23:40
1  
That aspect is already well-covered in David Titarenco's answer. It depends somewhat on what you're trying to accomplish with your objects, and how (in)specific you want to get with them. –  Makoto Sep 30 '12 at 23:41

More than polymorphism you should probably think about responsabilities.

You "board" class should do just something like

piece.move();

and the piece should know how to move. So if you have like a dice you can pass to the move method the number and act consequently as

piece.move(moves);

EDIT:

the board should manage the movements, so let the move method return an int of the steps made by the piece. The movement should be managed from another class, like board, not from the piece itself.

I suggest you a very interesting book about OO Analysis: "Applying uml and patterns" by Craig Larman. It contains also a step-by-step example of a board game as Monopoly!

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As the piece needs to have knowledge of the board, this isn't possible unless I pass the board each time, right? I need to make sure the move won't push it off the edge of the board (so I have to check the indices of the 2D-array) and make sure no other pieces currently occupy the space it intends to move to. –  Doug Smith Sep 30 '12 at 23:58
    
Conceptually a piece shouldn't have the knowledge of the board because it's just a piece. Make the move method return an int to understand how many steps did and manage this information with your board. : ) –  Enrichman Oct 1 '12 at 8:21

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