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I'm writing a closure that looks like this:

(function(){

   var OutterScope = 1;

   (function RunThisLoop() {

      OutterScope++;
      console.log(OutterScope);

      setInterval(RunThisLoop, 1000);

   })();

})();

Here is the jsfiddle. The problem is that the console output seems off: it's supposed to update every second but it seems to be updating by more than one second every second and then it eventually crashes the browser. Why is that?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Likely its running out of resources from invoking RunThisLoop and setting up the interval again and again and again...

You might want setTimeout instead or move the setInterval outside of RunThisLoop.

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Yes, setTimeout is probably what was being looked for. setInterval will cause exponential spawning. –  Matt Whipple Oct 1 '12 at 1:40
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Every time you run the function, you add more scheduled interval timers. Eventually they snowball and consume all CPU resources.

This is the best way to fix it (there are almost no scenarios where setInterval() can be used without clearInterval()):

(function(){

   var OuterScope = 1;
   var myInterval = setInterval(RunThisLoop, 1000);

   function RunThisLoop() {

      OuterScope++;
      console.log(OuterScope);
      //stop clause 
      if (OuterScope > 10) clearInterval(myInterval);    
   };

})();​
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When you run RunThisLoop() a context is created to contain its local state.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
Then the recursive call to RunThisLoop() creates a new context for the local state of the new instance.
... Oops! Stack overflow!

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It's already answered, this is just a clarification:

By using setInterval you schedule a new set of loops, and since you do that inside the loop it grows exponentially: For each second you double the number of calls:

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 4
  4. 8
  5. 16
  6. 32
  7. 64
  8. 128
  9. 256
  10. 512
  11. 1 024
  12. 2 048
  13. 4 096
  14. 8 192
  15. 16 384
  16. 32 768
  17. 65 536
  18. 131 072
  19. 262 144
  20. 524 288
  21. 1 048 576
  22. 2 097 152
  23. 4 194 304
  24. 8 388 608
  25. 16 777 216
  26. 33 554 432
  27. 67 108 864
  28. 134 217 728
  29. 268 435 456
  30. 536 870 912
  31. 1 073 741 824
  32. 2 147 483 648
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Did you write them all out of your head? I usually bumble at 2^18 as it is the first one rarely used as any type of range or mask. –  Alex Pakka Feb 25 '13 at 9:17
    
@AlexPakka 1-17 I know by heart, after that I need a calculator. –  some Mar 15 '13 at 22:13
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