Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I already understand that .* means zero or more of any character, but Could someone explain how .* in the following work and what it would match?

.*([a-m/]*).*

.*([a-m/]+).*

.*?([a-m/]*).*
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Ken White, Michael Berkowski, Jakob Bowyer, pad, Mike Pennington Oct 2 '12 at 9:38

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
In Regex, . refers to any character, be it a number, an aplhabet character, or any other special character. * means zero or more times. –  asgs Oct 1 '12 at 2:08
2  
It's simple enough - any symbol, present zero or more times - but there's a ton of nuances under that. What's more, it's an extremely central concept in regular expressions. Go out right now and read a backgrounder on regular expressions. You'll get further, faster, that way. –  Michael Petrotta Oct 1 '12 at 2:09

4 Answers 4

the dot means anything can go here and the star means at least 0 times so .* accepts any sequence of characters, including an empty string.

share|improve this answer

The function of .* in your examples is to make sure that the containing expression could be surrounded with anything (or nothing). The dot represents an arbitrary character, and the asterisk says that the character before can be repeated an arbitrary number of times (or not at all).

share|improve this answer

.* means "any character, any number of repetitions."

share|improve this answer

Each case is different:

.*([a-m/]*).*

The first .* will probably match the whole string, because [a-m/] is not required to be present, and the first * is greedy and comes first.

.*([a-m/]+).*

The first .* will match the whole string up to the last character that matches [a-m/] since only one is required, and the first * is greedy and comes first.

.*?([a-m/]*).*

The first .*? will match the string up to the FIRST character that matches [a-m/], because *? is not greedy, then [a-m/]+ will match all it can, because + is greedy, and then the last .* will match the rest of the string.

share|improve this answer
    
Nicely done! +1 –  XIVSolutions Oct 1 '12 at 3:15

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.