Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Preprocessor Directives to define function macros in C. Can I have multiple if/else if statements in a function macro?

If yes how do I write it?

#define WRITE(str,id) #str(id)

// HERES where I am having difficulty
#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(windowID, type) if type==1 WRITE(draw_text,windowID) else if type==2 WRITE(draw_image,windowID) else if type==3 WRITE(draw_hyperlink,windowID)

// usage
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(112, 1);
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(178, 2);
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(988, 3);

// At compile time the above should be converted to...
draw_text(112);
draw_image(178);
draw_hyperlink(988);

I am aware how to perform a single if else statement in a Function Macro but not how to do it with multiple if/else if's:

// if else eg
#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(windowID, type) ((type)==(1))?WRITE(draw_text,windowID):WRITE(draw_image,windowID)

Note: Before you ask "Why the hell are you programming like this?" :P its because I am writting in a language that is very similar to C called 4dm, except there are no structs, pointers or the ability to declare new data types. So I am forced to resort to Preprocessor Directives in order to achieve some form of virtual functions(used when I dont know the type of window - image, hyperlink, etc. - that I am working with).

share|improve this question
    
you should be able to expand that macro with as many if-else-if-else-if... you want. noted: glad I'm not the one debugging a DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW() expansion, esp if you draw that out a dozen or more clauses. –  WhozCraig Oct 1 '12 at 2:29
    
Why the pound "#" character before str? #define WRITE(str,id) #str(id) Shouldnt that be #define WRITE(str,id) str(id) –  imreal Oct 1 '12 at 2:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try it out like this:

#define WRITE(str,id) str(id)

// HERES where I am having difficulty
#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(windowID, type) if (type==1) \
WRITE(draw_text,windowID) \
else if (type==2) \
WRITE(draw_image,windowID) \
else if (type==3) \
WRITE(draw_hyperlink,windowID)

// usage
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(112, 1);
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(178, 2);
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(988, 3);
share|improve this answer
    
Wrap the macro in a do{...}while(0) or you can get bad behavior if used in an if statement. As it stands, the sequence if (something) DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(112,1); else foobar(); will not behave like you might expect: foobar() will only be called (sometimes) when something is true. –  Michael Burr Oct 1 '12 at 3:19

Just use the token pasting operator ## as basic pattern matching, like this:

#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(windowID, type) DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW_ ## type(windowID)

#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW_1 draw_text
#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW_2 draw_image
#define DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW_3 draw_hyperlink

Then use it like this:

DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(112, 1); // expands to draw_text(112, 1);
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(178, 2); // expands to draw_image(178);
DRAW_GENERIC_WINDOW(988, 3); // expands to draw_hyperlink(988);
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this works only if the type parameter will always be a literal number. It can be made to work if type is a macro that expands to a literal number. But you're out of luck if you want to use a variable or enum. That doesn't mean this isn't a good solution, just that you have to make sure the limitations are acceptable. –  Michael Burr Oct 1 '12 at 16:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.