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I seem to have a reasonable understanding of volatiles in general, but there's one seemingly obscure case, in which I'm not sure how things are supposed to work per the standard. I've read the relevant parts of C99 and a dozen or more related posts on SO, but can't find the logic in this case or a place where this case is explained.

Suppose we have this piece of code:

  int a, c;
  volatile int b;
  a = b = 1;
  c = b += 1; /* or equivalently c = ++b; */

Should a be evaluated like this:

  b = 1;
  a = b; // volatile is read

or like this:

  b = 1;
  a = 1; // volatile isn't read

?

Similarly, should c be evaluated like this:

  int tmp = b;
  tmp++;
  b = tmp;
  c = b; // volatile is read

or like this:

  int tmp = b;
  tmp++;
  b = tmp;
  c = tmp; // volatile isn't read

?

In simple cases like a = b; c = b; things are clear. But how about the ones above?

Basically, the question is, what exactly does "expression has the value of the left operand after the assignment" mean in 6.5.16c3 of C99 when the object is volatile?:

An assignment operator stores a value in the object designated by the left operand. An assignment expression has the value of the left operand after the assignment, but is not an lvalue.

Does it imply an extra read of the volatile to produce the value of the assignment expression?

UPDATE:

So, here's the dilemma.

If "the value of the object after the assignment" is not obtained from the extra read of the volatile object, then the compiler makes the assumption that the volatile object b:

  • is capable of holding an arbitrary int value that gets written into it, which it may not be (say, bit 0 is hardwired to 0, which is not an unusual thing with hardware registers, for which we are supposed to use volatiles)
  • cannot change between the point when the assigning write has occurred and the point when the expression value is obtained (and again it can be a problem with hardware registers)

And because of all that, the expression value, if not obtained from the extra read of the volatile object, does not yield the value of the volatile object, which the standard claims should be the case.

Both of these assumptions don't seem to fit well with the nature of volatile objects.

If, OTOH, "the value of the object after the assignment" is obtained from the extra implied read of said volatile object, then the side effects of evaluating assignment expressions with volatile left operands depend on whether the expression value is used or not or are completely arbitrary, which would be an odd, unexpected and poorly documented behavior.

share|improve this question
    
I hope that an assignment to a volatile doesn't imply a read after the store (whether or not the value of the assignment is used elsewhere doesn't matter). That would mean that by the standard's definition of volatile mapping hardware registers to volatile variables (or pointers to volatile) wouldn't have the semantics that nearly everyone relies on. –  Michael Burr Oct 1 '12 at 2:54
    
@MichaelBurr Good point. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 1 '12 at 2:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C11 clarifies that this is undefined.

You can find the final draft of C11 here. The second sentence you quoted now refers to footnote 111:

An assignment operator stores a value in the object designated by the left operand. An assignment expression has the value of the left operand after the assignment,111) but is not an lvalue.

Footnote 111 says this:

111) The implementation is permitted to read the object to determine the value but is not required to, even when the object has volatile-qualified type.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice! So, basically, the kind of code I presented in the question should be avoided unless implementation-specific behavior can be tolerated. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 1 '12 at 5:12
    
@AlexeyFrunze: I think that's kind of inevitable. Imagine a hardware address that reads as the square root of whatever value was last written there. Now imagine one that does so with an N-cycle delay to compute it. I don't think there's any way the standard can sensibly define "the value of the left operand after the assignment". It could require a read, but it couldn't dictate how quickly the read came after the write. So the only way to avoid implementation-specific behavior would be to forbid the read. –  Steve Jessop Oct 5 '12 at 9:08
    
@SteveJessop There's still the difference of reading and not reading. C99- should've been more clear here. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 5 '12 at 9:10
    
@Alexey: agreed. When the next standard clarifies something, that means the last standard was insufficiently clear (in the opinion of the C11 authors) :-) –  Steve Jessop Oct 5 '12 at 9:11
    
@rob: you say this is implementation-defined in C11. Is it? Just seeing the text you quote, I'd say that it's unspecified. The difference is whether or not the implementation has to document a way for programmers to know which it will do. –  Steve Jessop Oct 5 '12 at 9:13

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