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For example, I have the base class with pure virtual functions:

class IBase
{
    virtual void Function(const IBase& ref) = 0;
};

If I inheriet the class, do I have to overload 'Function' which takes the derived class as a parameter?

class Derived
{
    // this will be implemented
    virtual void Function(const IBase& ref) {}

    // does this have to be implemented
    virtual void Function(const Derived& ref) {}
};

Or can the compiler differentiate between the calls and I can skip writing the overload function?

Derived d();
...

IBase* dptr = &d; // ignoring cast for example

// would never really call 'Function' on itself, this is for example purposes
dptr->Function(d);

Notes: IBase::Function must take reference type, not pointer type.

I understand the rules of inheriting pure-virtual functions, just not this special case where the pure virtual function takes the base type as a parameter.

What I need to know is do I have to implement an overload in each inherited type that takes the inherited type as a parameter, or will the compiler understand that if I pass a Derived reference, to call on the virtual implementation?

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Derived d(); does not create an class object.But it declares a function by the name d which takes no parameters and returns an Derived type object.It is one of the Most vexing parse's in C++. –  Alok Save Oct 1 '12 at 3:19
    
That was just an example call to default constructor, so it would be within the scope of a function. I understand what you mean, though it was only to demonstrate the existence of a Derived instance. –  zackery.fix Oct 1 '12 at 3:38
    
You could simply say Derived d; –  Alok Save Oct 1 '12 at 3:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, if you have a Function(const IBase&) in the base class and override it in the derived class, you can pass references to the derived class to Function and the Function(const IBase&) will be called.

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Nitpick: There is no function oerloading accross Inheritance hierarchy, what you get is function hiding rather than function overloading –  Alok Save Oct 1 '12 at 3:11
    
I modified the post to better reflect my intentions. –  zackery.fix Oct 1 '12 at 3:11
1  
If I understand you correctly, yes, you have to write a Function(const Base&) in every derived class, but you don't need to write a Function(const Derived&), the Base overload will be called if you pass a Derived –  Seth Carnegie Oct 1 '12 at 3:17
    
@Als Thanks, fixed. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 1 '12 at 3:18
    
@Seth exactly what I mean :) Thank you! You should modify your answer so I can select it :D –  zackery.fix Oct 1 '12 at 3:24

What I need to know is do I have to implement an overload in each inherited type that takes the inherited type as a parameter, or will the compiler understand that if I pass a Derived reference, to call on the virtual implementation?

If you only override the function defined in the base type and not add an overload, the compiler will convert all instances of Derived to IBase and call the existing function.

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