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I'm working through an algorithm problem set which poses the following question:

"Determine if a string has all unique characters. Assume you can only use arrays".

I have a working solution, but I would like to see if there is anything better optimized in terms of time complexity. I do not want to use LINQ. Appreciate any help you can provide!

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    FindDupes("crocodile");
}

static string FindDupes(string text)
{
    if (text.Length == 0 || text.Length > 256)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("String is either empty or too long");
    }

    char[] str = new char[text.Length];
    char[] output = new char[text.Length];

    int strLength = 0;
    int outputLength = 0;

    foreach (char value in text)
    {
        bool dupe = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < strLength; i++)
        {
            if (value == str[i])
            {
                dupe = true;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (!dupe)
        {
            str[strLength] = value;
            strLength++;

            output[outputLength] = value;
            outputLength++;
        }
    }
    return new string(output, 0, outputLength);
}
share|improve this question
3  
This should be on codereview.stackexchange.com –  Dave Zych Oct 1 '12 at 4:07
2  
The overhead is that you did the nested loop - iterating through the length of the string - instead of using the simpler IndexOf function. Tip: When coding try and think of things as Abstract. If I asked you to write a function to tally the ages of each person in this thread, what would you call the method? SumAges(int[] ages) or - abstract the functionality from the purpose and call it Sum(int[] numbers). Or vice versa would you think twice about a nested loop operation on a string that checks if a char is in the string rather than looking for an inbuilt BCL string method? –  Jeremy Thompson Oct 1 '12 at 4:16
    
@DaveZych - Hi Dave, I do not know of codereview.stackexchange.com. What is the protocol for posting questions on SO vs CR? –  mynameisneo Oct 1 '12 at 4:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If time complexity is all you care about you could map the characters to int values, then have an array of bool values which remember if you've seen a particular character value previously.

Something like ... [not tested]

bool[] array = new bool[256]; // or larger for Unicode

foreach (char value in text)
  if (array[(int)value])
    return false;
  else
    array[(int)value] = true;

return true; 
share|improve this answer
    
PS "Determine if a string has all unique characters" implies a boolean result, not a string of unique characters or a string with the duplicates removed. –  Ian Mercer Oct 1 '12 at 4:32
    
That is the best answer for what OP is asking. You find a dupe and break as soon as possible, and static mapping with simple flag if the symbol already occurred is the fastest check up you can do. EDIT: @Ian even if ... it's very easy to alter your solution, to copy only non duplicate characters into a new string. It is still best with explicit algorithm. Not some fancy one-liner. PS: a typo - missing bracket ] in if (array[(int)char). –  luk32 Oct 1 '12 at 4:33
    
There are a couple of syntax errors with the code above, the invalid expression term char should have been value –  chridam May 27 '13 at 14:37
    
Thanks, fixed it. –  Ian Mercer May 27 '13 at 15:24

try this,

    string RemoveDuplicateChars(string key)
    {
        string table = string.Empty;
        string result = string.Empty;
        foreach (char value in key)
        {
            if (table.IndexOf(value) == -1)
            {
                table += value;
                result += value;
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

usage

Console.WriteLine(RemoveDuplicateChars("hello"));
Console.WriteLine(RemoveDuplicateChars("helo"));
Console.WriteLine(RemoveDuplicateChars("Crocodile"));

output

helo
helo
Crocdile
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please suggest what is the use of two blank strings? I feel like either of the table or result would have been sufficient. –  Victor Mukherjee Oct 1 '12 at 4:14
    
@SteveWellens why does it fail on Crocodile? it has duplicate letter o right? –  John Woo Oct 1 '12 at 4:17
    
+1 for a solution without LINQ –  Habib Oct 1 '12 at 4:31
public boolean ifUnique(String toCheck){
    String str="";
    for(int i=0;i<toCheck.length();i++)
    {
         if(str.contains(""+toCheck.charAt(i)))
             return false;
         str+=toCheck.charAt(i);
    }
    return true;
}

EDIT:

You may also consider to omit the boundary case where toCheck is an empty string.

share|improve this answer

The following code works:

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        isUniqueChart("text");
        Console.ReadKey();

    }

    static Boolean isUniqueChart(string text)
    {
        if (text.Length == 0 || text.Length > 256)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(" The text is empty or too larg");
            return false;
        }
        Boolean[] char_set = new Boolean[256];
        for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++)
        {
            int val = text[i];//already found this char in the string
            if (char_set[val])
            {
                Console.WriteLine(" The text is not unique");
                return false;
            }
            char_set[val] = true;
        }
        Console.WriteLine(" The text is unique");
        return true;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that the characters are limited to 255. Any character beyond this will cause an error such as Ā. Why not just use a dictionary? –  Andy Meyers Apr 9 '13 at 20:25

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