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I am trying to create a PHP function that will echo info from a db. My col names look like banana[1], banana[2], apple[1], apple[2], apple[3], and so on.

The function will select the fruit

function fruits($fruit){

}

and then within that function I'll loop through the fruits.

How do I echo these?

echo $fruit[$i];

obviously doesn't work.

Pretty basic, but I can't figure out. Concatenation kills me.

function ponctuation($section,$sect){

switch($section){
    case 'apple':
        $i=1;
    break;
    case 'banana':
        $i=13;
    break;
}

global $mysql_tablename;
global $FName;
global $Lname;

if(isset($mysql_tablename)){
$result = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM $mysql_tablename WHERE FName='$FName' AND Lname='$Lname'");
    $row = mysql_fetch_array($result);

echo '<form method="post" action="ponctuation.php?'.${$section.$sect}.'_valider">';
echo '<ul>';
$query = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM `ponct_enonces` WHERE `section`='$section' AND `sect`='$sect'");
while($row_q = mysql_fetch_assoc($query)) {
    if($row_q['enon']==0 && $row_q['senon']==0){
        echo '<h2>'.$row_q['enonce'].'</h2>';
    }
    if($row_q['enon']==1){
            echo '<h3>'.$row_q['enonce'].'</h3>';
            echo '<textarea rows="3" cols="100" name="'.$i.'" wrap="physical">' . $row[$section[$i]] . '</textarea>';
    }
    if($row_q['senon']==1){
            echo '<h4>'.$row_q['enonce'].'</h4>';
            echo '<textarea rows="3" cols="100" name="'.$i.'" wrap="physical">' . $row[$section]. '</textarea>';
    }
    $i++;
    }
echo '</ol>';
echo '<input type="submit" name="submit" value="Valider"/>';
echo '</form>';
}

}

The code is a little ugly, and some vars have French names, other have English names.

share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with echo $fruit[$i]? –  Vulcan Oct 1 '12 at 4:09
    
Don't hav enough information to help you. Maybe posting the code fragment where you say you're looping the fruits array may help. –  Hernan Velasquez Oct 1 '12 at 4:12
    
Did you mean $row['banana[1]']=blabla..., $row['banana[2]']=blabla..? If so, just do foreach($row as $fruit) echo $fruit; –  Marcus Oct 1 '12 at 4:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

col names won't be expanded into PHP array structures for you, e.g.

SELECT fruit[1], fruit[2], ...., fruit[100]

will give you the equivalent of

$row = array(
   'fruit[1]' => someval,
   'fruit[2]' => someval,
   ...
);

if you want to iterate those, you'll have to get ugly:

$fruit = array();
for ($i = 0; $i <= 100; $i++) {
    $fruit[$i] = $row['fruit[' . $i . ']'];
}

which begs the question of... why? This is a horrible data structure to be using. Properly normalizing it into a 'fruit attributes' sub-table would save you this trouble, and also allow you to have n attributes, rather than the fixed 1..100 range or whatever it is you have.

share|improve this answer
    
So if I don't want to get ugly, how should I call my cols? –  Sarah Oct 1 '12 at 4:14
    
Do some normalization on it –  Marc B Oct 1 '12 at 4:15
    
I'm sorry... normalization? Still pretty new to PHP. –  Sarah Oct 1 '12 at 4:18
    
Should I call them apple1, apple2 instead? That's what I first did, but then I was told to call them apple[1] and so on, that it would be easier to handle. –  Sarah Oct 1 '12 at 4:26
    
database concept. follow the link and do some reading. doesn't have anything to do with php, other than you're using php to talk to a database. –  Marc B Oct 1 '12 at 4:26

If you're attempting to loop over all the columns in a row, you can use fetch_array:

$result = $mysqli->query($query);
$row = $result->fetch_array();

// loop over columns
for ($i = 0, $count = count($row); $i < $count; $i++)
    echo $row[$i];

That way, you won't have to worry about the column names. I might be misunderstanding your question, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Why call count() for every iteration ? –  Zaffy Oct 1 '12 at 4:19
    
@Zaffy - Well, to be fair, a row with five columns wouldn't be a huge performance hit (unless it's fetching many rows, that is). But you're right, I should (and did) optimize it. –  jeff Oct 1 '12 at 4:23

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