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For each point (x,y) in a data frame, I want to calculate the sum of the euclidean distances from that point to all other points in the data frame that do not have the same 'group' label. Here is a hacky for-loop version of what I'm trying to achieve:

# some fake data
d <- data.frame(group=rep(c('a','b','c'),each=3), x=sample(1:9), y=sample(1:9), z=NA)
for (i in 1:nrow(d)) {
  d2 <- subset(d,group!=d$group[i])
  d$z[i] <- sum(sqrt((d$x[i]-d2$x)^2 + (d$y[i]-d2$y)^2))
} 

For example, the desired value for point a1 should be the sum of distances from a1 to each of b1, b2, b3, c1, c2, c3, but NOT including the distances a1-a2 or a1-a3. Is there a vectorized way to accomplish this? I'm sure it's an obvious solution... I've tried various configurations of by() and apply() but can't seem to hit on the answer.

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maybe you could benchmark your for loop solutions against @Backlin's answer? –  Paul Hiemstra Oct 1 '12 at 6:55
    
benchmarks added in a separate answer below. –  drammock Oct 1 '12 at 16:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is a very nice way to solve this efficiently: precalculate all distances and subset them rather than the points, to avoid repeating the same calculations.

dists <- as.matrix(dist(d[2:3]))
d$z <- sapply(seq(d$group), function(i) sum(dists[i, !d$group %in% d$group[i]]))
share|improve this answer
    
The OP already pre-allocated d to the correct length. –  Paul Hiemstra Oct 1 '12 at 6:44
    
Oops, corrected it now. –  Backlin Oct 1 '12 at 6:46
    
+1, by using dist you also gain the possibility to use other distance measures. And a large part of the efficiency probably comes from the fact that the calculations are done in C. –  Paul Hiemstra Oct 1 '12 at 6:46
    
I agree about the merits of dist() although I specifically didn't use it in my question because the actual formula I'm using is more complicated than simple euclidean distance and needs to be spelled out manually. –  drammock Oct 1 '12 at 16:21

Results of benchmarking Backlin's solution vs loop (made the sample data a bit bigger to amplify difference):

d <- data.frame(group=rep(letters[1:10],each=100), x=sample(1:1000), y=sample(1:1000), z=NA)
loopMethod <- function(d) {
  for (i in 1:nrow(d)) {
    d2 <- subset(d,group!=d$group[i])
    d$z[i] <- sum(sqrt((d$x[i]-d2$x)^2 + (d$y[i]-d2$y)^2))
  }
}
backlinMethod <- function(d) {
  dists <- as.matrix(dist(d[2:3]))
  d$z <- sapply(seq(d$group), function(i) sum(dists[i, !d$group %in% d$group[i]]))
}
system.time(loopMethod(d))
 user  system elapsed 
1.020   0.004   1.021 
system.time(backlinMethod(d))
 user  system elapsed 
0.472   0.052   0.525 
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for taking the effort, although it is more common to add this as an edit to either your questions, or less common as an edit to an answer. –  Paul Hiemstra Oct 1 '12 at 16:33

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