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I am relatively new to python and I find it to be useful since I do need to routinely find values out of a large csv file thus I tried to use it.

This is my csv file:
Name, Tag, Size, Height1, Height2,
Name1, B1, 244,42798,5900
Name2, B4, 200,22798,2234
Name3, B5, 240,25798,2745
Name4, B7, 220,32798,4590

I tried to use this code but I still get them jumbled up.

import csv
input = open('file.csv','r')
number_top_values =  raw_input(‘How many top values you need to find?’) #number of top values
file = csv.reader(input)
line1 = file.next()
height = [(row[3],(row[4])) for row in file]
height.sort(key = lambda x: x[1])
height.reverse()
height = height[:number_top_values]
print height

I need to find in the column the top values for Height1 and Height2 (top 2 or top 3 so on depending on how many top values I need to find) and get the entire row having these top values. Any suggestions or possible answers will be a great help. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

You're currently using this:

height = [(row[3],(row[4])) for row in file]
height.sort(key = lambda x: x[1])
height.reverse()

In the first line there, you remove some of the data you need (since you need the whole row). The third line can be made redundant with a modification to the second line. Together:

height = list(file)
height.sort(key=lambda x: int(x[3]), reverse=True)

This sorts on Height1. If you want to sort on Height2, change 3 to 4. If you want to sort on one and then the other, you can sort twice or do something a little trickier:

height.sort(key=lambda x: (int(x[3]), int(x[4])), reverse=True)
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-x[3] or -x[4] won't work, because x[3] and x[4] are strings. +1 for the sort trick anyway! –  Anuj Gupta Oct 1 '12 at 4:48
    
Thank you for all the comments and answers as well as the explanations making me understand the codes easier. –  user1710791 Oct 1 '12 at 7:14
    
@AnujGupta: Oh, you're right; I missed that. I'll edit my answer. –  icktoofay Oct 2 '12 at 3:02

Mostly what icktoofay said :)

Working code:

import csv
inputfile = open('file.csv','r')
#don't forget int() to convert input to integer for slicing
while(True):
    try:
        number_top_values =  int(raw_input('How many top values you need to find?')) #number of top values
    except ValueError:
        print "Invalid input! Please try again"
    else:
        break
csvfile = csv.reader(inputfile)
height = list(csvfile)[1:] #exclude first line for labels
height1 = sorted(height, key = lambda x: int(x[3]), reverse=True)[:number_top_values]
height2 = sorted(height, key = lambda x: int(x[4]), reverse=True)[:number_top_values]
# or height.sort(key = lambda x: (int(x[3]),int(x[4])), reverse=True) for double sort
print height1
print height2
inputfile.close()
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for all the comments and answers as well as the explanations making me understand the codes easier. Thanks for the reply, Anuj Gupta and to Icktoofay. –  user1710791 Oct 1 '12 at 7:13
    
Oh neat, I didn't know about reverse. +1 –  icktoofay Oct 2 '12 at 3:08

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