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I've been getting acquainted with metaprogramming by solving various toy problems. Here's one that has me stumped: How to write a metaprogram that provides the size of an integral type argument in terms of bits. In particular, I'd like to do it without CHAR_BIT or any other magic numbers.

I started with the following non-metaprogram:

template <typename T>
int sizeInBits(void) {
    T flag = 1;
    int count = 0;
    while (flag != 0) {
        flag <<= 1;
        ++count;
    }
    return count;
}

Converted to a metaprogram, I thought it would look like this:

template<typename T, int COUNT = 0, T FLAG = 1>
struct SizeInBits {
    enum {Result = SizeInBits<T, COUNT + 1, FLAG << 1 >::Result};
};

template<typename T, int COUNT>
struct SizeInBits<T, COUNT, 0> {
    enum {Result = COUNT};
};

However, this program fails to compile because apparently it is illegal to specialize on a non-type template parameter that has a template parameter type, and so I get the following error message using gcc 4.6:

error: type ‘T’ of template argument ‘0’ depends on a template parameter

Any ideas?

Edit:
I am essentially looking for the metaprogram equivalent of the magic numbers in <climits> and <limits>. So, for example, I would like SizeInBits<char>::Result to give 8 on my system, and SizeInBits<unsigned>::Result to give 32.

Note regarding validity of left bitwise shift operator on signed types:
In the comments, there was some concern whether FLAG << 1 is defined or not for signed types when overflow occurs. According to the C++03 standard quoted in this post, it is defined and does what the above algos expect.

share|improve this question
1  
You're aware that integral promotion happens around the << operator, and that shifting a signed int past its bit lenght is undefined behavior? (I.e. I don't think your approach will work.) CHAR_BITS and sizeof aren't "magic", they're part of the standard. You should use them or type traits/numeric limits. –  Mat Oct 1 '12 at 5:25
    
sizeof returns the size in chars. What you can do is estimating the size of a char and then multiply sizeof (T) with that number. –  FuleSnabel Oct 1 '12 at 5:37
    
@FuleSnabel Yes, but the "estimating the size of a char" part is what I want this program to do. –  dsmith Oct 1 '12 at 5:40
    
@Mat Perhaps I'm mistaken, but I thought that left bit shifting was well defined when the right operand (1 in my case) was sufficiently small? And I would never use this in place of the "magic numbers" in <limits> - as I said, it is a toy problem. I've come up against a particular limitation of templates and I'm wondering if there is a way around it? –  dsmith Oct 1 '12 at 5:44
    
@dsmith: with signed types, the result must be representable in the target type for the shift to be well-defined. (I.e. it's undefined as soon as the 1 "drops off the high end".) –  Mat Oct 1 '12 at 5:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should do the trick:

template<typename T, unsigned long long flag = 1uLL>
struct bits_in {
    enum {value = 1 + bits_in<T, (unsigned long long)(T)(flag << 1)>::value};
};

template<typename T>
struct bits_in<T, 0uLL> {
    enum {value = 0};
};

unlike Nicolas's version it is simpler, produces no warnings, and actually works correctly.

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The type of a non-type template argument cannot depend on a template parameter of a partial specialization. The compiler will not allow the following partial specialization:

template <class T, T t> class X { };

// Invalid partial specialization
template <class T> class X<T, 25> { };

In order to solve this problem you can just use int FLAG:

#include <iostream> 

template<typename T, int COUNT = 0, int FLAG = 1>
struct SizeInBits {
    enum { 
        Result = SizeInBits<T, COUNT + 1, FLAG << 1>::Result
    };
};

template<typename T, int COUNT>
struct SizeInBits<T, COUNT, 0> {
    enum {
        Result = COUNT
    };
};

int main() {
   std::cout << SizeInBits<int, 10>::Result << std::endl;
}

But it seems to be you need sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT or like this:

#include <iostream> 
#include <climits>

template<typename T>
struct SizeInBits {
    enum { 
        Result = sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT
    };
};

int main() {
   std::cout << SizeInBits<long>::Result << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you've provided an explanation of the error message, but I was hoping to get at a way to design the metaprogram to avoid this limitation. –  dsmith Oct 1 '12 at 5:49
    
@dsmith just use int FLAG instead of T FLAG. –  fasked Oct 1 '12 at 5:51
    
Yes, that allows it to compile, but then the result is for s int regardless of the supplied type parameter. For example, on my system SizeInBits<char>::Result, SizeInBits<int>::Result and SizeInBits<long>::Result all give 32 as the result. However, this points to a partial solution: restrict it to char and write a metaprogram for CharSizeInBits<size_t COUNT = 0, char FLAG = 1>. –  dsmith Oct 1 '12 at 6:00
    
Common! You already use bit-wise shift operator. What is type cannot be shifted by int or unsigned bits? –  fasked Oct 1 '12 at 6:05
    
Sorry, I think perhaps my question wasn't clear enough. I'm looking for something that is, in fact, the metaprogram equivalent of the magic numbers defined in <climits> and <limits>. So, for example, I am looking for SizeInBits<char>::Result to give 8 on my system. I will modify the question statement to indicate this. –  dsmith Oct 1 '12 at 6:08

What about this:

template<typename T, int COUNT = 0, int FLAG = 1>
struct SizeInBits {
    enum {Result = SizeInBits<T, COUNT + 1, static_cast<T>(FLAG) << 1 >::Result};
};

template<typename T, int COUNT>
struct SizeInBits<T, COUNT, 0> {
    enum {Result = COUNT};
};

It worked for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Probably use uintmax_t rather than int for FLAG, to make this work for types bigger than int. Of course uintmax_t is theoretically less portable, it's in C++11 and C99 but not C++03. –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '12 at 9:32

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