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I was trying out the time -p command on Linux and I wrote some code to waste CPU cycles:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
 long int c;

 long int ss;

 for(c = 0;c < 10000000;c++) {
  ss += c*c;
 }

 cout<<ss<<endl;

 return 0;
}

I noticed something funny after running it a few times, however:

me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030741067648912
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030742538841328
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030742228685600
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030740402651312
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030740207543344
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030740346553856
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030741629275040
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030740397307072
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030742928964784
me@octopus:~/Desktop> ./test
1292030741780094096

Not only did I not get the same number every time, as I would expect, I didn't get the same number even once. What is going on here?

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2  
Whoops. This is embarrassing. =( –  mimicocotopus Oct 1 '12 at 5:51
    
I'm wondering why you got a different value each time. The 'official language answer' is that it invokes undefined behavior, and this is absolutely true, you should never rely on it behaving in any particular way. But in most implementations it's usually deterministic, and this gives the same result for every run. I'm curious exactly what's going on under the hood that's causing the indeterminism you see. –  Omnifarious Oct 1 '12 at 6:21
    
@Omnifarious The int value is not initialized, therefore it contains whatever was at that memory location, which can change between two executions –  BЈовић Oct 1 '12 at 6:44
    
@BЈовић: Yes. And it's also permissible for the program to crash, or to turn your computer into a large monkey unicorn hybrid that attacks you with barbed tentacles. But, on most implementations, it's a section of the stack that always contains some value left over from program initialization code. Or it's a register that has some value that's always the same for the same reason. I wonder if the implementation is purposely making sure the value varies to help people catch bugs. –  Omnifarious Oct 1 '12 at 6:51
    
@Omnifarious No, you shouldn't catch such problems at run time - rather at compile time. Obviously, the example was not compiled with good compiler options, otherwise it would warn about uninitialized variable (-Wuninitialized option for gcc). –  BЈовић Oct 1 '12 at 6:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You have not initialized ss to zero therefore its initial value is undefined. You need:

long int ss = 0;
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7  
Nit pick: it's not random. Random suggests you can rely on getting different values when running the program repeatedly. It's undefined. –  hvd Oct 1 '12 at 5:56
1  
@hvd! Even for 'undefined', those 32bits of long will have some value which will correspond to a number. So, I think the word 'random' is fine here. –  Shashwat Oct 1 '12 at 7:33
    
@Shashwat The reason I pointed it out is because depending on the compiler and compiler settings, you could very well by design get the same value every time you run the program. That wouldn't be random, but it would be a valid result of "undefined". –  hvd Oct 1 '12 at 7:37
1  
I'd call the value arbitrary. –  avakar Oct 1 '12 at 8:30
1  
In C++ it's actually undefined behavior to read an uninitialized object. In practice that UB will manifest as reading an arbitrary value, but in theory the optimizer could assume that values are initialized and perform some code transformation that does something more peculiar if it isn't. For example there's no guarantee in C++ that unsigned int a; std::cout << a + a prints an even number, or that std::cout << a << ' ' << a prints the same number twice. Imagine that failure to initialize could upset the register allocator and cause it to not know where a is. –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '12 at 8:45

You haven't initialized ss. The initial value could be anything.

long int ss = 0;
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You have to initialize ss, otherwise you get unpredictable results.

long int ss = 0;

Uninitialized variables have an undetermined value in C and C++, unlike some other programming languages like Java and C# which get proper default values according to the type. So pay attention to this for C/C++.

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ss += c*c;

is always different because in your first iteration of the loop ss is always random.

You have to initialize it first to 0 to work as you expected.

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It's interesting to hear what a compiler has to say:

#include <cstdio>

int main() {
  long int ss;

  for(long int c = 0; c < 10000000; c++) {
    ss += c*c;
  }

  printf("%ld", ss);

  return 0;
}

(I use C IOs because it produces less junk in the IR, but the behavior is similar with streams)

Procuces the following LLVM IR (with optimizations on):

define i32 @main() nounwind uwtable {
  %1 = tail call i32 (i8*, ...)* @printf(c"%ld\00", i64 undef)
  ret i32 0
}

I believe the undef speaks for itself.

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