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I have a JavaScript application hosted at x.com which uses AJAX (through jQuery) to contact an Apache server hosted on the LAN environment (with a static IP, 192.168.1.5).

The Apache server exposes an API which requires the user to have a specific cookie set to use it.

My problem is that I can't get the Apache server to set a cookie with the correct domain (192.168.1.5), so that the browser sends the cookie with the AJAX call.

Is there any way to set a cookie with an IP as the domain? All examples I have seen require that the domain is of the form example.org.

The scenario is as follows:

  1. The JavaScript application at x.com sends an AJAX authentication request to 192.168.1.5.
  2. The response from 192.168.1.5 has a Set-Cookie header which should set the cookie to the 192.168.1.5 domain.
  3. The JavaScript application at x.com sends an AJAX request to the API at 192.168.1.5 with the cookie from step 2 as a part of the request.
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Setting the bare IP as the cookie domain should work. Cookies in AJAX should work too. So you have to debug the issue one step at a time. Did you check the browser's cookie storage to see what your AJAX requests are putting in there? –  Jon Oct 1 '12 at 8:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Both server and client need to explicitly tell the other that they want cookies.

JavaScript

xhrInstance.withCredentials = true;

Server Header

Access-Control-Allow-Credentials: true

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/HTTP_access_control#Requests_with_credentials

To sum it up: it has nothing to do with the IP address. The host of the cookie can be an IP address or a domain name.

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We already use the two headers you specify and the response actually tries to set the cookie. However, because we use AJAX to call the local ip, the domain of the cookie needs to be set to the local IP. If we don't specify a domain of the cookie, it is set to the domain of the requester site (x.com) instead of the IP address. The question is therefore not how to trigger the server and client to use cookies, but how to associate the cookie to the correct domain (a local IP). Using the setcookie method of PHP we have been unable to set the domain of the cookie to a local IP. –  pwind Oct 1 '12 at 13:31
    
Sound like weird and wrong behaviour. If it actually does what you say, than that's a security risk (you are saying the server listening on 192.168.1.5 sets a domain for x.com ? That should be impossible). –  Prinzhorn Oct 1 '12 at 14:11
    
Webapplication at x.com calls 192.168.1.5 (using ajax) and a cookie should be set for 192.168.1.5 to be used for all future requests to 192.168.1.5. As far as I can see this is a valid scenario. The server at 192.168.1.5 should be able to issue cookies for it self and normally this would be done without specifying a domain in the set-cookie header (as the cookie therefore is set to the domain of the requester). However, in this case, the requester is x.com but the cookie still needs to be set for 192.168.1.5 domain. This is not a problem if 192.168.1.5 had a public domain name but it hasn't. –  pwind Oct 1 '12 at 14:30

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