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So the master theorem is invalid if the difference between f(n) and n^log_b(a) is a non polynomial difference. Does a polynomial difference mean the ratio between f(n) / n^log_b(a)? I know if the ratio is log(n), then the theorem is invalid. But if the ratio between the two is n^C, where c is some constant then does it mean it is valid? Is there a limit to how small C can be? Can it be n^0.3?

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possible duplicate of Why is there the regularity condition in the master theorem? –  Gilles Oct 3 '12 at 16:13

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up vote 5 down vote accepted
 T (n) = 2T (n/2)+ n/ log n

Here we can't apply master theorem (non-polynomial difference between f(n) and n log_b(a))

(n/logn)/ n^log_2(2) = logn which is not == n^c for any c real number

Polynomial Difference Means:

f(n) / n log_b(a) == n^c

where c can be any positive real number.

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