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Is there a way to add created_at and updated_at fields to a mongoose schema, without having to pass them in everytime new MyModel() is called?

The created_at field would be a date and only added when a document is created. The updated_at field would be updated with new date whenever save() is called on a document.

I have tried this in my schema, but the field does not show up unless I expcitly add it:

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name    : { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
  , created_at    : { type: Date, required: true, default: Date.now }
});
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Use the built-in timestamps option for your Schema.

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name: { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
},
{
    timestamps: true
});

This will automatically add createdAt and updatedAt fields to your schema.

http://mongoosejs.com/docs/guide.html#timestamps

share|improve this answer

This is what I ended up doing:

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name    : { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
  , created_at    : { type: Date }
  , updated_at    : { type: Date }
});


ItemSchema.pre('save', function(next){
  now = new Date();
  this.updated_at = now;
  if ( !this.created_at ) {
    this.created_at = now;
  }
  next();
});
share|improve this answer
7  
1. Store the current time in a local var and assign it instead of each time calling new Date(), this will make sure that at first pass created_at and updated_at have the same excect value. 2. new Date => new Date() – Shay Erlichmen Oct 27 '13 at 9:22
10  
Would just like to point out that if you use ObjectId then you can get the created_at from there....you do not need a separate field. Check out getTimestamp() – Xerri Nov 26 '13 at 15:58
5  
Other option for the created_at could be to change the model to -> created_at: { type: Date, default: Date.now }, – OscarVGG Jan 19 '14 at 4:47
1  
@ajbraus Make a schema plugin – wlingke Jul 3 '15 at 16:48
1  
also use Date.now() where possible instead of new Date its faster as it is a static method – karlkurzer Feb 5 at 23:27

UPDATE: (2.5 years later)

You can now use the #timestamps option with mongoose version >= 4.0.

let ItemSchema = new Schema({
  name: { type: String, required: true, trim: true }
},
{
  timestamps: true
});

If set timestamps, mongoose assigns createdAt and updatedAt fields to your schema, the type assigned is Date.

You can also specify the timestamp fileds' names:

timestamps: { createdAt: 'created_at', updatedAt: 'updated_at' }

Note: If you are working on a big application with critical data you should reconsider updating your documents. I would advise you to work with immutable, append-only data (lambda architecture). What this means is that you only ever allow inserts. Updates and deletes should not be allowed! If you would like to "delete" a record, you could easily insert a new version of the document with some timestamp/version filed and then set a deleted field to true. Similarly if you want to update a document – you create a new one with the appropriate fields updated and the rest of the fields copied over.Then in order to query this document you would get the one with the newest timestamp or the highest version which is not "deleted" (the deleted field is undefined or false`).

Data immutability ensures that your data is debuggable – you can trace the history of every document. You can also rollback to previous version of a document if something goes wrong. If you go with such an architecture ObjectId.getTimestamp() is all you need, and it is not Mongoose dependent.


ORIGINAL ANSWER:

If you are using ObjectId as your identity field you don't need created_at field. ObjectIds have a method called getTimestamp().

ObjectId("507c7f79bcf86cd7994f6c0e").getTimestamp()

This will return the following output:

ISODate("2012-10-15T21:26:17Z")

More info here How do I extract the created date out of a Mongo ObjectID

In order to add updated_at filed you need to use this:

var ArticleSchema = new Schema({
  updated_at: { type: Date }
  // rest of the fields go here
});

ArticleSchema.pre('save', function(done) {
  this.updated_at = new Date();
  done();
});
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2  
How do you do that in Mongoose/node.js? – Clive Sep 16 '13 at 20:44
4  
That's worth knowing even if it's not the solution that gets used, very interesting! – unwitting Aug 9 '14 at 10:47
    
But if i want to pass the create at date to the view, i would need to set special variable for this, or pass the id right? – user3052629 Nov 9 '15 at 20:04
    
That's very valuable information! but i have one worry, with this method (immutable data), the database, will grow big very fast! especially in an application where updates occur a lot! – Xsmael Jun 18 at 12:47
    
@Pavel Nikolov what about a semi immutable data approach ? in the sense that for a year data can be updated, and after each year each update will rather be an insertion, so as to keep one version of the data per year, or month, depends... – Xsmael Jun 18 at 13:15

As of Mongoose 4.0 you can now set a timestamps option on the Schema to have Mongoose handle this for you:

var thingSchema = new Schema({..}, { timestamps: true });

You can change the name of the fields used like so:

var thingSchema = new Schema({..}, { timestamps: { createdAt: 'created_at' } });

http://mongoosejs.com/docs/guide.html#timestamps

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1  
Seems like the best solution imo. Upvoted. – Jake Wilson Oct 24 '15 at 3:52
1  
Agreed, this is the best option in Mongoose 4.0. – Tadd Giles Nov 18 '15 at 20:58

This is how I achieved having created and updated.

Inside my schema I added the created and updated like so:

   /**
     * Article Schema
     */
    var ArticleSchema = new Schema({
        created: {
            type: Date,
            default: Date.now
        },
        updated: {
            type: Date,
            default: Date.now
        },
        title: {
            type: String,
            default: '',
            trim: true,
            required: 'Title cannot be blank'
        },
        content: {
            type: String,
            default: '',
            trim: true
        },
        user: {
            type: Schema.ObjectId,
            ref: 'User'
        }
    });

Then in my article update method inside the article controller I added:

/**
     * Update a article
     */
    exports.update = function(req, res) {
        var article = req.article;

        article = _.extend(article, req.body);
        article.set("updated", Date.now());

        article.save(function(err) {
            if (err) {
                return res.status(400).send({
                    message: errorHandler.getErrorMessage(err)
                });
            } else {
                res.json(article);
            }
        });
    };

The bold sections are the parts of interest.

share|improve this answer

If use update() or findOneAndUpdate()

with {upsert: true} option

you can use $setOnInsert

var update = {
  updatedAt: new Date(),
  $setOnInsert: {
    createdAt: new Date()
  }
};
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1  
Nice and elegant – Bhargav Nanekalva May 27 '15 at 13:30

You can use the timestamp plugin of mongoose-troop to add this behavior to any schema.

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You can use this plugin very easily. From the docs:

var timestamps = require('mongoose-timestamp');
var UserSchema = new Schema({
    username: String
});
UserSchema.plugin(timestamps);
mongoose.model('User', UserSchema);
var User = mongoose.model('User', UserSchema)

And also set the name of the fields if you wish:

mongoose.plugin(timestamps,  {
  createdAt: 'created_at', 
  updatedAt: 'updated_at'
});
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Use a function to return the computed default value:

var ItemSchema = new Schema({
    name: {
      type: String,
      required: true,
      trim: true
    },
    created_at: {
      type: Date,
      default: function(){
        return Date.now();
      }
    },
    updated_at: {
      type: Date,
      default: function(){
        return Date.now();
      }
    }
});

ItemSchema.pre('save', function(done) {
  this.updated_at = Date.now();
  done();
});
share|improve this answer
    
no need to wrap Date.now() in a function just do: ...default: Date.now() – karlkurzer Feb 5 at 23:23
    
I wrap it in a function so I can mock '.now()' in tests. Otherwise it's only run once during initialization and the value can't easily be changed. – orourkedd Feb 5 at 23:28

You can use middleware and virtuals. Here is an example for your updated_at field:

ItemSchema.virtual('name').set(function (name) {
  this.updated_at = Date.now;
  return name;
});
share|improve this answer
    
When would this actually get set? and will it persist? So 3 days from now, it would still have a date from 3 days ago? – chovy Oct 1 '12 at 9:21
    
the virtual will be called whenever you change the given property, in this case name. And yes, it should be persistent. – zemirco Oct 1 '12 at 9:29
    
would this work for all fields on Item object? I"m not sure this solution does what I want – chovy Oct 3 '12 at 9:41

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