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I have a table T1 with fields f1 and f2 and a table T2 with fields f3 and f4.

Let 's have some dummy values :

T1: (1,1) (2,3) (3,3) (4,3) (5,1)
T2: (1,1) (1,2) (3,1) (3,3)

We can think of f2 and f3 as defining the same thing, a bridge between T1 and T2. I would like to retrieve every f1 that is not associated with a f4 value of 2 . So my expected output would be :

(2),(3),(4) as at the 1 and 5 F1 value F2=F3=1 has f4=2 on T2.

How can I achieve this ?

Edit 2 : I forgot to mention that T1 is derived from a long process and expected to be a small table whereas T2 is massive, and impossible to operate on without indexes

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2  
Perhaps I've misunderstood the explanation (possible) but the explanation, dummy values and expected results don't match up for me. –  Anthony Grist Oct 1 '12 at 8:29
    
corrected it ^^ –  Pumpkin Oct 1 '12 at 8:31
    
Native SQL is a techno (SAP related), a pseudo-name ? –  Raphaël Althaus Oct 1 '12 at 8:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because f2 and f3 are the same thing, you join between the two fields.

select f1 
from t1 
    left join t2 
        on t1.f2 = t2.f3 
        and t2.f4=2
where f3 is null    
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Can you elaborate on what f3 is null does ? Haven't you joined all the unwanted scenarios ? –  Pumpkin Oct 1 '12 at 8:45
    
because it is a left (outer) join, it matches all entries in t1, and the where .. is null removes those where there is a match. –  podiluska Oct 1 '12 at 8:47
    
Would this query not return (2) , (3) , (4) as well as T2 entry (1,1) is a match for f1 = 2,3,4 –  Pumpkin Oct 1 '12 at 8:52
    
The left join alone would return 1,2,3,4,5 from which the where clause removes 1 and 5 because they match to (1,2). Try it. –  podiluska Oct 1 '12 at 8:55
SELECT DISTINCT F1
FROM T1
WHERE (SELECT COUNT(F3) FROM T2 WHERE T1.F2 = T2.F3 AND T2.F4 = 2) = 0
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1  
Wouldn't this query have performance issues ? Is there an alternative to counting all, keeping in mind that all it takes is one. –  Pumpkin Oct 1 '12 at 8:49

LEFT JOIN should be work for this. DISTINCT can be used to avoid duplicates

SELECT DISTINCT f1
FROM T1
LEFT JOIN T2
ON T1.f2 = T2.f3
WHERE T2.f4 IS NULL OR T2.f4 <> 2
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