Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm still working on overloading a Sum function that can work with either vectors/lists or maps. My vector/list version of the sum function works fine, and I think my code for the map version is pretty decent, but when I test it, the compiler seems to think I'm trying to call the list/vector version of the function, and throws some compiler errors. Relevant code is as follows:

template <typename T>
const double Sum(typename T start_iter, typename T end_iter)
{// code...
}

template <typename T>
const double Sum(map<typename T, double> start_iter, map<typename T, double> end_iter)
{// different code...
}

int main()
{

map<string, double> test_map; // construct empty map

test_map["Line1"] = 10; // add some data
test_map["Line2"] = 15; 

Sum(test_map.begin(),test_map.end()) // this tries to call the list/vector version of sum
}

How am I confusing these functions? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
First, you're missing two ::iterators in the second declaration. The typename in map<typename T, double> is also unnecessary. Second, in map<T, double>::iterator, T is in a non-deducible context, so you're out of luck. You can try to overload based on whether std::iterator<Iter>::value_type is a pair or not. – avakar Oct 1 '12 at 9:01
    
So, it should be more like this? const double Sum<map<T,double>>(map<typename T, double>::iterator start_iter, map<typename T, double>::iterator end_iter) – nsw Oct 1 '12 at 9:08
    
@Clark: yes, but also pay attention to what avakar said about deducing T. If you call your function as Sum(test_map.begin(),test_map.end()), the compiler cannot work out by template argument deduction that T is supposed to be string. You could call it as Sum<string>(test_map.begin(),test_map.end()). – Steve Jessop Oct 1 '12 at 9:12
    
Regardless of how you write it, it won't work, because the compiler will not be able to deduce that T is a string by matching map<T, double>::iterator against map<string, double>::iterator. That's what is meant by non-deducible context. – avakar Oct 1 '12 at 9:13
1  
The reason, btw, is that there's nothing in the standard to say whether map<string,double>::iterator is the same type as something_else::iterator. iterator is just a typedef in a class, it's a name for a type. Template argument deduction works on the types passed, not on the names for them. "Appears as a typedef in some class" is not a property of a type that the standard pays any attention to. – Steve Jessop Oct 1 '12 at 9:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

A slight alternative to what is being discussed in the comments:

template <typename Vt>
struct getter
{
  Vt operator()(const Vt& v)
  {
    return v;
  }
};

template <typename F, typename G>
struct getter<std::pair<F, G> >
{
  G operator()(const std::pair<F, G>& v)
  {
    return v.second;
  }
};


template <typename Iterator>
int sum(Iterator it, Iterator end)
{
  int r = 0;
  for(; it != end; ++it)
    r += getter<typename Iterator::value_type>()(*it);
  return r;
}

Now the sum function doesn't care what it is iterating over, simply rely on the appropriate getter to get the values...

For example:

  std::map<int, int> f;
  f[1] = 3;
  f[2] = 6;
  f[3] = 12;
  f[4] = 24;

  std::vector<int> g;
  g.push_back(4);
  g.push_back(8);
  g.push_back(16);
  g.push_back(32);

  std::cout << sum(f.begin(), f.end()) << std::endl;
  std::cout << sum(g.begin(), g.end()) << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice solution that doesn't involve enable_if (which is what I'd use :) ). – avakar Oct 1 '12 at 9:16
    
Although beware that calling sum using iterators to a vector<pair<int,int>> now adds up all the second elements. In the questioner's original code it presumably doesn't compile (because the body of Sum will try to add elements), and that might be desirable. – Steve Jessop Oct 1 '12 at 9:17

Well, as explained in the previous remarks, the compiler cannot deduce the container type of the iterator given as the parameter of Sum.

However, it is possible to use the fact that std::map<X,Y>::iterator::value_type is a pair of values std::pair<XX, YY>. Of course, this would not limit the desired specializing of Sum to std::map iterators, but to any container iterator returning a pair of element (eg. std::vector< std::pair<std::string, double> >.)

If this does not bother you, or if sthg like std::vector< std::pair<std::string, double> > should use the same specialization, then the following code seems to give the desired results in your case:

#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits/remove_reference.hpp>


// a small structure to 
template <class U>
struct is_a_key_pair_it
{
  typedef boost::false_type type;
};

template <class A, class B>
struct is_a_key_pair_it< std::pair<A, B> >
{
  typedef boost::true_type type;
};

// using boost::disable_if to avoid the following code to be instanciated 
// for iterators returning a std::pair
template <typename T>
const double Sum(T start_iter, T end_iter, 
  typename boost::disable_if<
    typename is_a_key_pair_it<
      typename boost::remove_reference<typename T::value_type>::type 
    >::type >::type * dummy = 0)
{
  // code...
  std::cout << "non specialized" << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

// using boost::enable_if to limit the following specializing of Sum
// to iterators returning a std::pair
template <typename T>
const double Sum(T start_iter, T end_iter, 
  typename boost::enable_if<
    typename is_a_key_pair_it<
      typename boost::remove_reference<typename T::value_type>::type 
    >::type >::type * dummy = 0)
{
  // different code...
  std::cout << "specialized" << std::endl;
  return 1;
}




int main()
{
  typedef std::map<std::string, double> map_t;

  // check
  assert(is_a_key_pair_it<map_t::iterator::value_type>::type::value);
  // works also for const_iterators
  assert(is_a_key_pair_it<map_t::const_iterator::value_type>::type::value);

  map_t test_map;
  test_map["Line1"] = 10; // add some data
  test_map["Line2"] = 15; 

  double ret = Sum(test_map.begin(),test_map.end()); 
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.