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I am making a test WinForm application, to try and monitor a processes with the same name. But it is not working for some reason.

But my label on my form stays zero.

Form's global variables:

Thread checkProcess;
List<PerformanceCounter> pcs;

Button on click that starts the monitoring process

private void btnMonitor_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    List<Process> proc = new List<Process>();
    foreach (Process p in Process.GetProcesses())
    {
        if (p.ProcessName.IndexOf(txtProcessName.Text) > -1)
        {
            proc.Add(p);
        }
    }
    pcs = new List<PerformanceCounter>();
    int k = 0;
    foreach (Process p in proc)
    {
        pcs.Add(new PerformanceCounter("Process", "% Processor Time", k > 0 ?
            string.Format("{0}#{1}", p.ProcessName, k) : p.ProcessName, true));
        lstbxPC.Items.Add(k > 0 ?
            string.Format("{0}#{1}", p.ProcessName, k) : p.ProcessName);
        k++;
    }
    checkProcess = new Thread(CheckProcess);
    checkProcess.Start();
}

The method (starts in its own thread) that monitors and updates the label:

private void CheckProcess()
{
    int temp = 0;
    while (true)
    {
        temp = 0;
        foreach (PerformanceCounter pc in pcs)
        {
            if (temp < pc.NextValue())
            {
                temp = (int)pc.NextValue();
            }

        }
        // Set the label in a ThreadSafe way. This does work
        SetControlPropertyThreadSafe(lblCPU, "Text", Convert.ToString(temp) + "%");
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Do not call pc.NextValue() twice in a row, only call it once per second. –  Hans Passant Oct 1 '12 at 12:49
    
I can't believe I did not see that! Most likely the reason for it not working. –  ZioN Oct 2 '12 at 10:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this on for size:

    private void btnMonitor_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var proc = Process.GetProcesses().Where(p => p.ProcessName.IndexOf(this.txtProcessName.Text) > -1);
        var k = 1;
        var appendSuffix = proc.Count() > 1;

        this.pcs = new List<PerformanceCounter>();
        foreach (var p in proc)
        {
            this.pcs.Add(new PerformanceCounter(
                "Process",
                "% Processor Time",
                appendSuffix ? string.Format("{0}#{1}", p.ProcessName, k) : p.ProcessName,
                true));
            this.lstbxPC.Items.Add(appendSuffix ? string.Format("{0}#{1}", p.ProcessName, k) : p.ProcessName);
            k++;
        }

        this.checkProcess = new Thread(this.CheckProcess);
        this.checkProcess.Start();
    }

    private void CheckProcess()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            var temp = 0;

            foreach (var pc in this.pcs)
            {
                var nextValue = pc.NextValue();

                if (temp < nextValue)
                {
                    temp = (int)nextValue;
                }
            }

            // Set the label in a ThreadSafe way. This does work.
            SetControlPropertyThreadSafe(lblCPU, "Text", Convert.ToString(temp) + "%");
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I like how you fetched the processes. Where can I learn more how to use code like that? –  ZioN Oct 2 '12 at 10:09
1  
That is known as LINQ (Language INtegrated Query). Here's a page with some code samples you can use to start learning it: code.msdn.microsoft.com/101-LINQ-Samples-3fb9811b –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 2 '12 at 12:16

There are many things to check :

  • Does your pcs have items ? (Debug)
  • What is the text in txtProcessName ? (pattern is {process name without exe}#{nb}, like devenv#1, devenv#2, ...}
  • Can you read Performance Counters ? (check security)
  • Because you are casting NextValue() to int, you will not see any changes < 1%

You should also change your code, because if a process stops, you will get an exception (instance is missing in the counter category).

share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I should handle, if a process stops. A try catch, in the private void CheckProcess() method. When caught, just delete the PerformanceCounter, which the process stops, from the list. Should do the trick. –  ZioN Oct 2 '12 at 10:07

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