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I have a excel sheet in xlsx format and it has a very complex macro which calculates investment information based on some 20 odd variables.

I am supposed to use this xlsx file and run the macro in a unix environment. Basically integrating it with my back end Rails application.

My question is, how can I run the macro from Linux shell, do I need to setup mono in order to use win32ole? Or can I use roo gem to accomplish this.

Thanks.

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If it is an xlsx spreadsheet, it doesn't contain macros, only .xlsb, .xlsm and .xls can contain VBA code –  Kyle Oct 1 '12 at 9:33
    
don't think you will be able to run VBA Macros without Excel installed. And that will be a challenge in Unix. –  Remy Oct 1 '12 at 9:38
    
thanks Kyle for pointing out xlsx files don't have VBA code, din't know that. Okay so, I opened the spreadsheet with roo ruby gem, I can write to cells but I can't seem to find a way of updating other cells after I change value of one cell according to the formulae defined in the spreadsheet. Yes Remy it is indeed going to be a challenge if I have replicate the financial model, let's see how it goes. I'm still trying to find a way to run xlsx formulae and recompute values after I updated certain cells. –  qwexar Oct 1 '12 at 14:22
    
Quote: "I can write to cells but I can't seem to find a way of updating other cells after I change value of one cell according to the formulae defined in the spreadsheet." --> I've tried what you said and my formulae gets updated correctly when I change value in the relevant cells..Are you pressing enter using Win32ole after each change? 2nd question will be are you working with different worksheets or files? –  Xwris Stoixeia Oct 2 '12 at 11:09
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Do you have to run the calculation in the Excel file? It might be less effort to extract the equation and translate it to Ruby so that you can run it natively. –  Lex R Oct 2 '12 at 19:36

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