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Let's say there is a table called T1

CREATE TABLE T1
(
  GID INT NOT NULL,
  Attrib1 BIT NOT NULL,
  Attrib1Date DATE NOT NULL,
  Attrib2 BIT NOT NULL,
  CONSTRAINT PK_T1 PRIMARY KEY (GID)
)

Now, I'm creating indexes for query, where only rows with Attrib1 equal 1 or Attrib2 equal 1 are interesting. Let's say there are only 20% of rows like that.

Please, do not concern about Attrib1 to Attribe2 corelation - they are given only for two separate examples.

It's obvious to use filtered indexes - I mean: INDEX-es with WHERE clause. But question is what columns to include?

Sample queries:

SELECT * FROM T1 WHERE Attrib1 = 1 ORDER BY Attrib1Date
SELECT * FROM T1 WHERE Attrib2 = 1

Example and question 1)

Which INDEX is more correct?

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib1
ON T1 (Attrib1, Attrib1Date)
WHERE Attrib1 = 1

OR

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib1
ON T1 (Attrib1Date, Attrib1)
WHERE Attrib1 = 1

OR

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib1
ON T1 (Attrib1Date)
WHERE Attrib1 = 1

Example and question 2)

Is it correct to build filtered index containing only column by which is filtered, like:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib2
ON T1 (Attrib2)
WHERE Attrib2 = 1
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1 Answer

First, dispelling the misconception:

Let's say there are only 20% of rows like that... It's obvious to use filtered indexes

No, it's not obvious at all. I think the index needs to be around 1% selectivity to sometimes be considered. Commonly, the threshold is quoted at 5%. There's an article about it but I just can't remember where. Search for it on Google.

On your 3 variants

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib1 ON T1 (Attrib1, Attrib1Date) WHERE Attrib1 = 1

Because of SQL Server's implementation of filtered indexes, Attrib1 is required in the index key. Having it at position 1 doesn't make it very selective, though.

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib1 ON T1 (Attrib1Date, Attrib1) WHERE Attrib1 = 1

This one is more selective than the above, and would be preferable. The pre-condition is used to check the applicability of the filtered index, but after that, the regular query engine takes over, which will do the normal selectivity checks etc.

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib1 ON T1 (Attrib1Date) WHERE Attrib1 = 1

For the reason stated above, this one is less desirable, because the processing goes:

  1. Query contains WHERE Attrib1 = 1 -> this index can be considered (with other potentials)
  2. Is Attrib1Date selective enough?
  3. The index contains (Attrib1Date + record-pointer) => can these service the request, including the WHERE Attrib1 = 1 condition

It fails at #3

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX IX_Attrib2 ON T1 (Attrib2) WHERE Attrib2 = 1

Yes, you would do this if only to get the index created, and the inclusion of the column is for the regular query optimizer/engine that takes over beyond the filtered index applicability check.

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Storing the redundant additional column in the filtered index is unfortunately often required per my link under the question. –  Martin Smith Oct 1 '12 at 10:53
    
Thanks Martin. I've looked through the SO question and connect issue, tried a few things and summarized my understanding. The implementation sort of makes sense, for performance reasons and for not creating two branches within "query optimizer" for filtered indexes. –  RichardTheKiwi Oct 1 '12 at 11:26
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