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weird request, I'm using a configuration manager function to require configuration files so that we only load up the required variables rather than the hundreds of ones setup.

The problem is, one of the files has a class and variables set, now they get included but then they can't be accessed from the main script.

The function to load the file is :

    function load($OPT){
        if (file_exists(ABSPATH. "includes/config/".$OPT.".config.php")){
            require_once(ABSPATH. "includes/config/".$OPT.".config.php");
        } else {
            echo "Missing configuration script ".$OPT.", application has been halted.";
            exit();
        }
    }

I have also tried to do this in a class but cam across the same issue

class configManager {
    function load($OPT){
        if (file_exists(ABSPATH. "includes/config/".$OPT.".config.php")){
            require_once(ABSPATH. "includes/config/".$OPT.".config.php");
        } else {
            echo "Missing configuration script ".$OPT.", application has been halted.";
            exit();
        }
    }
}

The file it includes would have code like the following

define('COMPANYNAME', 'NAME');
define("IPADDRESS", $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']);   // IP Address of accessing user
require_once (ABSPATH . 'includes/classes/mysql.class.php'); // class to manage the database
$DB = new sqlClass; 
var_dump($DB);  

Now the var_dump in the above code outputs as expected, however if you did a var_dump like shown below it comes back null!

require_once (ABSPATH . 'includes/functions/_configmanager.php'); // Class to manage the configuration of the site.
loadconfig("global");
var_dump($DB);

Anyone have any ideas on how to achieve this?

share|improve this question
    
So you have a function that behaves like an autoloader, except it loads configuration directives. You load it within a function, but you hope to be able to access them globally. And your solution should be simple: use a class for fetching configuration directives. Use an autoloader to include appropriate configuration class that extends the base config class. And all you have to do is do something like CFGClass::get('variable name'); or $cfg->get('variable name'), depending on method you go with. This is only a quick example of course. – N.B. Oct 1 '12 at 12:00
    
@N.B. Sorry I don't follow the example – Neo Oct 1 '12 at 12:21
    
The example says don't include a file into a function, use classes to handle configuration variables. Don't use define('variable', 'value') because you cannot define constants and variables in a function and expect them to work everywhere. Use 1 class that loads sub-classes using PHP's autoload functions and use that class to get the variable values. The class can be accessible anywhere, and you don't pollute the global scope. – N.B. Oct 1 '12 at 14:28

I don't like this solution of configuration. However, there is a solution. As mentioned hakra, the scope is inside the function. You can use global to make variables visible to the outside.

Example:

global $DB;
require_once('configManager.php');
loadcfg('global');

global.cfg.php:

global $DB;
$DB = mysql_connect(...);

This will make sure, that $DB is handled as global variable, not as local.

BUT! try to not make global variables. Think about another solution. For example put to config only environment-based params, not the whole creation of the object. If you do it somewhere else, you can avoid the globals and make your code more readable and simple.

share|improve this answer
    
I hate globals as well, but it is looking like its the only way to do it. Unsure what you mean by the "put to config only encironment-based params" – Neo Oct 1 '12 at 12:23
1  
how are the configuration files different? I think it's in parameters as host, user, password etc. You can put only those into cfg file and create the object in the 'main' code. Example: configMan loads the configuration in constructor $cfgMan = new ConfigManager('local'). You can then store the cfg values in the object params. Than you can have fce for getting the DB object and it would look like $cfgMan->db(). CfgMan would make the instance for the DB on its parameters received from the cfg file. – macino Oct 4 '12 at 10:29

The scope of a variable is the context within which it is defined. For the most part all PHP variables only have a single scope. This single scope spans included and required files as well.

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