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Consider this type, is it as immutable as I can make it?

public struct SomeType
{
    public const int OneValue = 1;

    private static readonly one = new SomeType(one);

    private readonly int value;

    private SomeType(int value)
    {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public static One
    {
        get { return this.one; }
    }

    public static implicit operator int(SomeType source)
    {
        return source.value;
    }

    public void SomeSpecialization()
    {
    }
}

This allows me to do this,

var one = SomeType.One;

switch (one)
{
    case SomeType.OneValue:
        ...
}

but, is there anyway I can remove

public static implicit operator int(SomeType source)
    {
        return source.value;
    }

from the type definition and use the type like this?

var one = SomeType.One;

switch (one)
{
    case SomeType.One:
        ...
}
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Why don't you use enum? –  Cuong Le Oct 1 '12 at 11:07
    
@CuongLe, so that I can extend with SomeSpecialization, question altered. –  Jodrell Oct 1 '12 at 11:11
2  
For some scenarios you can write an extension method for en enum. –  Anton Sizikov Oct 1 '12 at 11:20
    
public static One { ... } ? SomeType or int ? –  AgentFire Oct 1 '12 at 11:28
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The case expressions in a switch statement can only be compile-time constants of certain built-in types and enums. So the answer is no: no matter what you do with your SomeType (short of turning it into an enum), you cannot use SomeType objects as case expressions.

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To be more correct, they can also be nullable<T> where T is one of the types I referred to in my answer. –  Gorpik Oct 1 '12 at 11:25
    
good spot, I was wondering if there was some way to transfer the magic used for enum and Nullable<T>, now that 4.5 is out. However, I suspect yours is the right answer. –  Jodrell Oct 1 '12 at 11:31
    
This is a language (C#) issue, not a framework (.NET) issue. As of today, there is no specification for C# 5.0, so the C# 4.0 specification still applies. According to section 8.7.2 of the specification, I'm afraid you're out of luck. –  Gorpik Oct 1 '12 at 11:43
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If you don't use Enum, try static class:

public static class SomeType
{
    public const int OneValue = 1;
    public const int SecondValue = 2;
}
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Does something of this help?

public struct SomeType<T> where T : IConvertible
{
    private static readonly T _one = (T)Convert.ChangeType(1, typeof(T));
    public static T One { get { return _one; } }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can achieve this implicitly with the type conversion operator. –  Jodrell Oct 1 '12 at 11:26
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