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In a particular way of using the default built-in "component streaming system", I've found that it's problematic that the value of a property is not written if it's equal to the default value.

Let's considering the following scheme:

You use WriteComponent() and ReadComponent() in order to save the particular state of a component. We call this state a preset. The component contains various Real-typed properties with a setter.

We know that if a property is equal to its default value then the preset won't include the value.

So for our component

  1. we set the property AFLoat to 0.0
  2. we save the preset in a stream (MyStream.WriteComponent(MyInstance))
  3. we set the property AFLoat to 0.101
  4. we reload the preset (MyStream.ReadComponent(MyInstance))

Finally after the reloading of the preset, AFLoat is still equal to 0.101 while we were expecting its value to be 0.0.

The origin of the bug is quite obviously that the default value of a property is never written in a component stream. So in step 2: the property is not written and then in step 4 it's not read...Quite anoying isn't it!

Is there a way to force the default value of a property to be written in a component stream ? Actually I have a home-made fix for the Real-typed properties but I'd like to know if there's a well know way to overcome the underlyed issue.

My custom fix is to reset the Real-typed properties to 0 by using TypInfos before calling ReadComponent()

Procedure ResetFloatToNull(Const AnObject: TObject; Recursive: Boolean);
Var
  i,j: Integer;
  LList: PPropList;
Begin
  j := GetPropList( AnObject, LList);
  If j > 0 Then For i:= 0 To j-1 Do
    Case LList^[i].PropType^.Kind Of
    // floats with the object scope
    tkFloat: SetFloatProp(AnObject,LList^[i].Name,0);
    // floats with a subobject scope (IsSubComponent)
    tkClass: If Recursive Then
      ResetFloatToNull( TObject(GetOrdProp(AnObject,LList^[i])), True);
    End;
  FreeMem(LList);
End;

But if no other methods exist, then (implicit & secondary question): shouldn't EMB gives up the default value ? While it has a little interest in the IDE object inspector (Reset to Inherited, in the contextual menu) it completely leads to various annoyances in the Component serialization system...

I hope you get the basic problem, otherwise I can add a small example...


Small demo of the bug (added after the first answer by DH and the comment war):

program Project1;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}
uses
  SysUtils,
  classes;

type
  TTestClass = class(TComponent)
  private
    ffloat1,ffloat2: single;
  published
    property float1: single read ffloat1 write ffloat1;
    property float2: single read ffloat2 write ffloat2;
  end;

var
  str: TMemoryStream;
  testclass: TTestClass;

begin
  testclass := TTestClass.Create(Nil);
  str := TMemoryStream.Create;
  //
  testclass.float1 := 0.31;
  testclass.float2 := 0.32;
  //
  testclass.float1 := 0.0;
  testclass.float2 := 0.2;
  str.WriteComponent(testclass);
  writeln( 'we have wrote a state when the prop 1 is equal to 0.0 and prop 2 is equal to 0.2');
  //
  testclass.float1 := 0.1;
  testclass.float2 := 0.3;
  writeln( 'then we set the prop 1 to 0.1 and prop 2 to 0.3');
  writeln('');
  //
  writeln( 'we reload the state saved when the prop 1 was equal to 0.0 and prop 2 to 0.2   and we get:');
  str.Position := 0;
  str.ReadComponent(testclass);
  writeln( Format( 'prop 1 equal to %.2f', [testclass.float1]));
  writeln( Format( 'prop 2 equal to %.2f', [testclass.float2]));
  //
  writeln('');
  writeln('prop 1 has not been restored because the default value 0.0 was not written');
  writeln('prop 2 has been restored because a non default value was written and read');
  //
  ReadLn;
  str.free;
  testclass.free;
end.
share|improve this question
    
If memory serves, you could use the nodefault directive for your property. – iMan Biglari Oct 1 '12 at 11:20
1  
No it doesn't work, I've tried this before posting my Q. Same remark stands for the Stored sepcifier. Both of them have no effect when the property is of type Real. – az01 Oct 1 '12 at 11:24
    
try "stored true" instead of default values. / i wonder if something like "default NaN" would work too. – Arioch 'The Oct 1 '12 at 11:49
1  
This doesn't work, cf. my previous comment. When no storage specifier is added then the property is implicitely considered as "Stored true". – az01 Oct 1 '12 at 11:52
    
Regarding the demo program. The bottom line is that your use of ReadComponent is not viable if the component has any properties that have a default value specified. I think you understand that well enough. So it all boils down to the fact that the streaming framework erroneously skips writing of real valued properties if their value is zero, even though real valued properties cannot have a default value. There's really not a lot you can do about that. Other than the two workarounds you already know of. – David Heffernan Oct 1 '12 at 14:53

It turns out that I was confused by the question. In fact default properties are not relevant here because real valued properties cannot have defaults.

And in fact the framework does not stream out real valued properties if they have a value of 0. Which means that real value properties effectively have a hard-coded default of 0. Which appears to be a monstrous design flaw in the streaming framework.

Just imagine for a minute a real valued property which is assigned a value of 1 in the component's constructor. This makes it impossible for the property to be assigned a value of 0 and have that value survive a round-trip through a .dfm file.

There is a way to work around this, but you need to override DefineProperties

type
  TMyComponent = class(TComponent)
  private
    FValue: Double;
    procedure WriteValue(Writer: TWriter);
  protected
    procedure DefineProperties(Filer: TFiler); override;
  public
    constructor Create(AOwner: TComponent); override;
  published
    property Value: Double read FValue write FValue;
  end;

constructor TMyComponent.Create(AOwner: TComponent);
begin
  inherited;
  FValue := 1.0;
end;

procedure TMyComponent.DefineProperties(Filer: TFiler);
begin
  inherited;
  Filer.DefineProperty('Value', nil, WriteValue, True);
end;

procedure TMyComponent.WriteValue(Writer: TWriter);
begin
  Writer.WriteDouble(FValue);
end;

The VCL bug is found in the Classes unit, in IsDefaultPropertyValue. Inside that function is this local function:

function IsDefaultFloatProp: Boolean;
var
  Value: Extended;
begin
  Value := GetFloatProp(Instance, PropInfo);
  if AncestorValid then
    Result := Value = GetFloatProp(Ancestor, PropInfo)
  else
    Result := Value = 0;
end;

Clearly this function should be implemented like this:

function IsDefaultFloatProp: Boolean;
var
  Value: Extended;
begin
  Value := GetFloatProp(Instance, PropInfo);
  if AncestorValid then
    Result := Value = GetFloatProp(Ancestor, PropInfo)
  else
    Result := False;
end;

The same fault appears to exist also in the handling of Int64, Variant and string properties. This is such a major flaw I'd expect it to be well-known. I'd expect there to be a bunch of discussions of this topic already on SO, Emba forums, and some QC reports. And there it is, a QC report from the dawn of time: QC#928. Since that report is over 10 years old and appears moribund, I created QC#109194.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes but I'm talking about Real numbers(we agree that a Real is either a Single or a Double ?!)). Reals can't have a default, this is an important part of the problem ! Your answer only applies to ordinal properties (integer,sets,bool, etc). – az01 Oct 1 '12 at 11:33
    
You were the one that brought up default values for properties! Let me think a bit more, but if what you say is true then most of your question makes no sense. If reals can't have defaults, then how can their values be omitted?! – David Heffernan Oct 1 '12 at 11:35
    
This is actually the problem, 0.0 seems to be a kind of implicit default for Real and then a property of type Real is never written if it's equal to 0.0 ! But as shown in my example, sometimes you need this implicit default value to be written. – az01 Oct 1 '12 at 11:38
    
@az01 OK, I think I'm up to speed now and have a solution for you. – David Heffernan Oct 1 '12 at 11:52
2  
One wonders what more information was needed.. – Sertac Akyuz Oct 1 '12 at 18:29

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