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I must obtain a SQLite SQL Sentence for ordering by nearest latitude and longitude coordinates, given a initial location.

THis is a example sentence for my table in the sqlite database:

SELECT id, name, lat, lng FROM items

EXAMPLE RESULT: 1, Museu, 41375310.0, 2175970.0

I must achieve this with SQLite, and with that table. I can't use another techniques because this is for a existen SQlite database that i can't change.

Exists a way to achieve this with Android and SQlite? I checked a lot of stackoverflow posts and i didn't find the way to achieve that

Thanks

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Can you give an example of what you want to happen for a particular initial location as well? –  Vinay S Shenoy Oct 1 '12 at 11:55
    
I must obtain a SQLite SQL Sentence for ordering by nearest latitude and longitude coordinates, given a initial location. –  AndroidUser99 Oct 1 '12 at 11:56
    
Yeah, I got that. But it would be helpful if you say what exactly you want to happen, if say, the initial location were "New York"? –  Vinay S Shenoy Oct 1 '12 at 11:58
    
if i give you as initial location the latitude and longitude of new york, then, i need the SQL sentence for get all the items of the table ordered by nearest latitude and longitude position to newyork –  AndroidUser99 Oct 1 '12 at 12:01
2  
Latitude of 41375310.0? Your semi-circle has more degrees than mine... This problem is more complicated than you think it is. Are you sure there are no third-party GIS libraries you can use? –  David Grant Oct 1 '12 at 12:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted
SELECT * AS distance FROM items ORDER BY ABS(location_lat - lat) + ABS(location_lng - lng) ASC

This should roughly sort the items on distance in MySQL, and should work in SQLite.
If you need to sort them preciser, you could try using the Pythagorean theorem (a^2 + b^2 = c^2) to get the exact distance.

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Thanks but your SQL sentence doesn't works properly, and the pythagorean theorem can't be done with sqlite, no pow and no sqrt functions, and i dont know the way to add these functions on sqlite and android –  AndroidUser99 Oct 1 '12 at 14:17
    
Perfectly working for me. Thanks @Darkwater –  Sachin Shelke Feb 20 at 14:17

If you're able to load the records; convert them to Locations and then use the distanceTo function I'd recommend that but...

You can approximate the distance between two points using plain SQL and the various approaches are laid out clearly here. The further apart the points you are comparing become then your values can become increasingly incorrect if you use a simple calculation

If you're calculating these things yourself and your locations can be anywhere then you might need to be aware of values wrapping around if you're comparing locations around the international date line.

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no, i can't fit this way, i must obtain the SQL sentence that gives me the ordered set of records. Also i can't use your second link way, because SQLITE doesn't have these functions avaiable –  AndroidUser99 Oct 1 '12 at 14:18
    
which maths functions aren't available in SQLite? Why are your constraints so tight? –  Paul D'Ambra Oct 1 '12 at 14:41

If you know, that 1 degree of latitude is about 111111 meters and 1 degree of longitude is 111111*cos(latitude) meters, then you can easily get all places inside a specific square.

SELECT * FROM items WHERE latitude BETWEEN %f AND %f AND longitude BETWEEN %f AND %f

This query is very fast, even with millions of rows. But don't forget to create an index for latitude and longitude:

CREATE INDEX position ON items (latitude, longitude)

I use this in Objective-C to obtain all places of interest that are within 3km around the current location:

double latDist = 1.0 / 111111.0 * 3.0;
double lonDist = 1.0 / ABS(111111.0*cos(location.coordinate.latitude)) * 3.0;

FMResultSet *results = [database executeQueryWithFormat:@"SELECT * FROM items WHERE latitude BETWEEN %f AND %f AND longitude BETWEEN %f AND %f", location.coordinate.latitude - latDist, location.coordinate.latitude + latDist, location.coordinate.longitude - lonDist, location.coordinate.longitude + lonDist];

You can now calculate the exact distance and sort your results...

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This is a good quick filter, that seems to work, but your scale of multiplier is off by a factor of 1000. If your 3.0 is in km, then the multiplier should be 111.1. –  mstenroos Sep 15 at 19:24

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