Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had XML files like this:

<root>
    <key0>value</key0>
    <key1>value</key1>
    <key2>value</key2>
</root>

It's easy to turn such file into key-value structure. Let's showcase the result in Python dict, for example:

{'key0': 'value', 'key1': 'value', 'key2': 'value'}

Now they added nested elements:

<root>
    <key0>value</key0>
    <key1>value</key1>
    <key2>value</key2>
    <key3>
        <sth0>value</sth0>
        <sth1>value</sth1>
    </key3>
</root>

Still easy:

{'key0': 'value', 'key1': 'value', 'key2': 'value', 'key3/sth0': 'value', 'key3/sth1': 'value'}

I think you got the point. Now what about this?

<root>
    <key0>value</key0>
    <key1>value</key1>
    <key1>
         <inner>value</inner>
    </key1>
    <key2>value</key2>
    <key3>
        <sth0>value</sth0>
        <sth1>value</sth1>
    </key3>
    <key3>
        <sth0>different value</sth0>
        <sth1>different value</sth1>
    </key3>
    <key3>
        <sth0>blah blah</sth0>
        <sth1>blah blah</sth1>
    </key3>
</root>

Of course, I could come up with something after a while of thinking, but something tells me I would meet more and more difficulties. So the question is: Is there an complex algorithm to 'serialize' values in similarly simple XML file into key-value form? It has to be deterministically serializable and unserializable and no values can be lost. Order of elements doesn't matter (Python dict in examples is not a random choice, it's really what I'm trying to get).

I know XMLs can be very complex (namespaces, attributes, whatever), but this is not the case. The only problem I need to properly resolve is nested values as presented and related multiplicity of the same keys.

share|improve this question
    
Why not use the XML as data, and use XPath to query the data? There are many pre-built libraries that implement this already. This one lxml.de even has 'objectify' too, which sounds close to what you want. I wouldn't name the sub elements like you have. I would make elements that have sub elements into collections. –  Adrian Oct 1 '12 at 12:40
    
I know turning these XMLs into 'objects' or 'documents' would be the best, but I can't do that right now. It's because I have a lot of legacy code working exclusively with key-value structures. I'd have to rewrite the whole ecosystem, which is not possible now. I need a middle step. –  Honza Javorek Oct 2 '12 at 10:18
1  
You could append something unique to the end of each name. Like <Key0> becomes Key0_unique , where unique is a ascending number or guid. –  Adrian Oct 2 '12 at 13:29
    
If you write it as an answer, I'd be able to accept it. I used algorithm similar to that and I think it is the best approach for the problem I presented. –  Honza Javorek Oct 29 '12 at 10:35
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Append something unique to the end of each name. Like becomes Key0_unique , where unique is a ascending number or guid.

(Although if your 'ecosystem' is big now and growing, I would consider sorting this out now rather than later.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

I think it would be best for you to use some sortf of xml-parser. I had similar issues and triend writing my xml parser for that, but as it turns out- it is not trivial and can change quite a bit. I could not recommend the following article more explaining the problem and common aproaches:

http://elegantcode.com/2010/08/07/dont-parse-that-xml/

If you can define a schema for that, you can use jaxb- nice and easy!

share|improve this answer
    
I have no problem with parsing the XML using common parsers or my own parser (I actually wrote a few of them). I have a problem with inventing an algorithm to serialize nested XML structure into key-value structure. See my comment: stackoverflow.com/questions/12672801/… –  Honza Javorek Oct 2 '12 at 10:21
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.