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What is the recommended way to zerofill a value in JavaScript? I imagine I could build a custom function to pad zeros on to a typecasted value, but I'm wondering if there is a more direct way to do this?

Note: By "zerofilled" I mean it in the database sense of the word (where a 6-digit zerofilled representation of the number 5 would be "000005").

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41 Answers 41

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Note to readers!

As commenters have pointed out, this solution is "clever", and as clever solutions often are, it's memory intensive and relatively slow. If performance is a concern for you, don't use this solution!

A simple function is all you need

function zeroFill( number, width )
{
  width -= number.toString().length;
  if ( width > 0 )
  {
    return new Array( width + (/\./.test( number ) ? 2 : 1) ).join( '0' ) + number;
  }
  return number + ""; // always return a string
}

you could bake this into a library if you want to conserve namespace or whatever. Like with jQuery's extend.

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5  
+1 that is a clever use of join –  Gabe Moothart Aug 12 '09 at 20:03
1  
Now you just need to take care of numbers like 50.1234 and you've got a readable version of my solution below! I did, however, assume that we were just left padding, not overall padding. –  coderjoe Aug 12 '09 at 20:16
4  
Not a fan of creating a new array each time you want to pad a value. Readers should be aware of the the potential memory and GC impact if they're doing large #'s of these (e.g. on a node.js server that's doing 1000's of these operations per second. @profitehlolz's answer would seem to be the better solution.) –  broofa Sep 24 '12 at 12:21
3  
This does not work for negative values: zeroFill(-10, 7) -> "0000-10" –  digitalbath Nov 7 '12 at 15:20

Simple way. You could add string multiplication for the pad and turn it into a function.

var pad = "000000";
var n = '5';
var result = (pad+n).slice(-pad.length);

As a function,

function paddy(n, p, c) {
    var pad_char = typeof c !== 'undefined' ? c : '0';
    var pad = new Array(1 + p).join(pad_char);
    return (pad + n).slice(-pad.length);
}
var fu = paddy(14, 5); // 00014
var bar = paddy(2, 4, '#'); // ###2
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45  
This is a very nice solution, best I've seen. For clarity, here's a simpler version I'm using to pad the minutes in time formatting: ('0'+minutes).slice(-2) –  Luke Ehresman Sep 14 '12 at 0:22
14  
This is 5 times slower than the implementation with a while loop: gist.github.com/4382935 –  andrewrk Dec 26 '12 at 20:37
15  
This has a FATAL FLAW with larger than expected numbers -- which is an extremely common occurrence. For example, paddy (888, 2) yields 88 and not 888 as required. This answer also does not handle negative numbers. –  Brock Adams Jun 15 '13 at 22:20
2  
@BrockAdams, zerofill is typically used for fixed width number/formatting cases -- therefore I think it'd actually be less likely (or even a non-issue) if given a 3 digit number when trying to do 2 digit zerofill. –  Seaux Dec 8 '13 at 23:15
4  
Performance measure amongst three top answers here: jsperf.com/left-zero-pad –  tomsmeding Feb 21 at 16:36

I actually had to come up with something like this recently. I figured there had to be a way to do it without using loops.

This is what I came up with.

function zeroPad(num, numZeros) {
	var n = Math.abs(num);
	var zeros = Math.max(0, numZeros - Math.floor(n).toString().length );
	var zeroString = Math.pow(10,zeros).toString().substr(1);
	if( num < 0 ) {
		zeroString = '-' + zeroString;
	}

	return zeroString+n;
}

Then just use it providing a number to zero pad:

> zeroPad(50,4);
"0050"

If the number is larger than the padding, the number will expand beyond the padding:

> zeroPad(51234, 3);
"51234"

Decimals are fine too!

> zeroPad(51.1234, 4);
"0051.1234"

If you don't mind polluting the global namespace you can add it to Number directly:

Number.prototype.leftZeroPad = function(numZeros) {
	var n = Math.abs(this);
	var zeros = Math.max(0, numZeros - Math.floor(n).toString().length );
	var zeroString = Math.pow(10,zeros).toString().substr(1);
	if( this < 0 ) {
		zeroString = '-' + zeroString;
	}

	return zeroString+n;
}

And if you'd rather have decimals take up space in the padding:

Number.prototype.leftZeroPad = function(numZeros) {
	var n = Math.abs(this);
	var zeros = Math.max(0, numZeros - n.toString().length );
	var zeroString = Math.pow(10,zeros).toString().substr(1);
	if( this < 0 ) {
		zeroString = '-' + zeroString;
	}

	return zeroString+n;
}

Cheers!

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6  
This is good, I like how it's readable and robust. The only thing I would change is the name of the numZeros parameter, since it's misleading. It's not the number of zeros you want to add, it's the minimum length the number should be. A better name would be numLength or even length. –  Senseful Jan 2 '12 at 4:23
9  
+1. Unlike the higher voted answers, this one handles negative numbers and does not return gross errors on overflow!!?! –  Brock Adams Jun 15 '13 at 22:39
8  
Performance measure amongst three top answers here: jsperf.com/left-zero-pad –  tomsmeding Feb 21 at 16:36
2  
I improved the performance of this answer by over 100% by using logarithms. Please see the logarithmic test case at http://jsperf.com/left-zero-pad/10 –  XDR Aug 18 at 4:30

If the fill number is known in advance not to exceed a certain value, there's another way to do this with no loops:

var fillZeroes = "00000000000000000000";  // max number of zero fill ever asked for in global

function zeroFill(number, width) {
    // make sure it's a string
    var input = number + "";  
    var prefix = "";
    if (input.charAt(0) === '-') {
        prefix = "-";
        input = input.slice(1);
        --width;
    }
    var fillAmt = Math.max(width - input.length, 0);
    return prefix + fillZeroes.slice(0, fillAmt) + input;
}

Test cases here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/N87mZ/

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1  
@BrockAdams - I wasn't sure whether calling zeroFill(-88, 5) should produce -00088 or -0088? I guess it depends upon whether you want the width argument to be the entire width of the number or just the number of digits (not including the negative sign). An implementer can easily switch the behavior to not include the negative sign by just removing the --width line of code. –  jfriend00 Jun 16 '13 at 3:07

I can't believe all the complex answers on here...just use this:


var zerofilled = ('0000'+n).slice(-4);

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1  
Good except for negative numbers and numbers longer than 4 digits. –  wberry Sep 19 at 22:40

The quick and dirty way:

y = (new Array(count + 1 - x.toString().length)).join('0') + x;

For x = 5 and count = 6 you'll have y = "000005"

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1  
I got y="0005" with the above, y = (new Array(count + 1 - x.toString().length)).join('0') + x; is what gave me y="000005" –  forforf May 23 '12 at 15:30
2  
@OrrSiloni: the shortest code solution is actually ('0000'+n).slice(-4) –  Seaux Dec 8 '13 at 23:17

Here's what I used to pad a number up to 7 characters.

new String("0000000" + number).slice(-7)

This approach will probably suffice for most people.

Edit: If you want to make it more generic you can do this:

new String(new Array(padding + 1).join("0") + number).slice(-padding)
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Here's a quick function I came up with to do the job. If anyone has a simpler approach, feel free to share!

function zerofill(number, length) {
    // Setup
    var result = number.toString();
    var pad = length - result.length;

    while(pad > 0) {
    	result = '0' + result;
    	pad--;
    }

    return result;
}
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1  
Wow, pretty much all the above comments are incorrect. @profitehlolz's solution is simpler and suitable for inlining (doesn't need to be a function). Meanwhile, for .vs. while performance is not different enough to be interesting: jsperf.com/fors-vs-while/34 –  broofa Sep 24 '12 at 12:07

Late to the party here, but I often use this construct for doing ad-hoc padding of some value n, known to be a positive, decimal:

(offset + n + '').substr(1);

Where offset is 10^^digits.

E.g. Padding to 5 digits, where n = 123:

(1e5 + 123 + '').substr(1); // => 00123

The hexidecimal version of this is slightly more verbose:

(0x100000 + 0x123).toString(16).substr(1); // => 00123

Note 1: I like @profitehlolz's solution as well, which is the string version of this, using slice()'s nifty negative-index feature.

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I use this snipet to get a 5 digits representation

(value+100000).toString().slice(-5) // "00123" with value=123
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The power of Math!

x = integer to pad
y = number of zeroes to pad

function zeroPad(x, y)
{
   y = Math.max(y-1,0);
   var n = (x / Math.pow(10,y)).toFixed(y);
   return n.replace('.','');  
}
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This one is less native, but may be the fastest...

zeroPad = function (num, count) {
    var pad = (num + '').length - count;
    while(--pad > -1) {
        num = '0' + num;
    }
    return num;
};
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I really don't know why, but no one did it in the most obvious way. Here it's my implementation.

Function:

/** Pad a number with 0 on the left */
function zeroPad(number, digits) {
    var num = number+"";
    while(num.length < digits){
        num='0'+num;
    }
    return num;
}

Prototype:

Number.prototype.zeroPad=function(digits){
    var num=this+"";
    while(num.length < digits){
        num='0'+num;
    }
    return(num);
};

Very straightforward, I can't see any way how this can be any simpler. For some reason I've seem many times here on SO, people just try to avoid 'for' and 'while' loops at any cost. Using regex will probably cost way more cycles for such a trivial 8 digit padding.

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First parameter is any real number, second parameter is a positive integer specifying the minimum number of digits to the left of the decimal point and third parameter is an optional positive integer specifying the number if digits to the right of the decimal point.

function zPad(n, l, r){
    return(a=String(n).match(/(^-?)(\d*)\.?(\d*)/))?a[1]+(Array(l).join(0)+a[2]).slice(-Math.max(l,a[2].length))+('undefined'!==typeof r?(0<r?'.':'')+(a[3]+Array(r+1).join(0)).slice(0,r):a[3]?'.'+a[3]:''):0
}

so

           zPad(6, 2) === '06'
          zPad(-6, 2) === '-06'
       zPad(600.2, 2) === '600.2'
        zPad(-600, 2) === '-600'
         zPad(6.2, 3) === '006.2'
        zPad(-6.2, 3) === '-006.2'
      zPad(6.2, 3, 0) === '006'
        zPad(6, 2, 3) === '06.000'
    zPad(600.2, 2, 3) === '600.200'
zPad(-600.1499, 2, 3) === '-600.149'
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Don't reinvent the wheel, use underscore string:

jsFiddle

var numToPad = '5';

alert(_.str.pad(numToPad, 6, '0')); // yields: '000005'
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Some monkeypatching also works

String.prototype.padLeft = function (n, c) {
  if (isNaN(n))
    return null;
  c = c || "0";
  return (new Array(n).join(c).substring(0, this.length-n)) + this; 
};
var paddedValue = "123".padLeft(6); // returns "000123"
var otherPadded = "TEXT".padLeft(8, " "); // returns "    TEXT"
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1  
-1 monkeypatching the toplevel namespacing in javascript is bad practice. –  Jeremy Wall Sep 7 '09 at 0:37
2  
True for Object and Array objects, but String is not bad –  Rodrigo Sep 11 '09 at 16:56
function pad(toPad, padChar, length){
    return (String(toPad).length < length)
        ? new Array(length - String(toPad).length + 1).join(padChar) + String(toPad)
        : toPad;
}

pad(5, 0, 6) = 000005

pad('10', 0, 2) = 10 // don't pad if not necessary

pad('S', 'O', 2) = SO

...etc.

Cheers

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Maybe I am to naive, but I think that this works in one simple and efficient line of code (for positive numbers):

padded = (value+Math.pow(10,total_length)+"").slice(1)

As long as you keep your length OK according to you set of values (as in any zero padding), this should work.

The steps are:

  1. Add the power of 10 with the correct number of 0's [69+1000 = 1069]
  2. Convert to string with +"" [1069 => "1069"]
  3. Slice the first 1, which resulted of first multiplication ["1069" => "069"]

For natural listings (files, dirs...) is quite useful.

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My solution

Number.prototype.PadLeft = function (length, digit) {
    var str = '' + this;
    while (str.length < length) {
        str = (digit || '0') + str;
    }
    return str;
};

Usage

var a = 567.25;
a.PadLeft(10); // 0000567.25

var b = 567.25;
b.PadLeft(20, '2'); // 22222222222222567.25
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After a, long, long time of testing 15 different functions/methods found in this questions answers, I now know which is the best (the most versatile and quickest).

I took 15 functions/methods from the answers to this question and made a script to measure the time taken to execute 100 pads. Each pad would pad the number 9 with 2000 zeros. This may seem excessive, and it is, but it gives you a good idea about the scaling of the functions.

The code I used can be found here: https://gist.github.com/NextToNothing/6325915

Feel free to modify and test the code yourself.

In order to get the most versatile method, you have to use a loop. This is because with very large numbers others are likely to fail, whereas, this will succeed.

So, which loop to use? Well, that would be a while loop. A for loop is still fast, but a while loop is just slightly quicker(a couple of ms) - and cleaner.

Answers like those by Wilco, Aleksandar Toplek or Vitim.us will do the job perfectly.

Personally, I tried a different approach. I tried to use a recursive function to pad the string/number. It worked out better than methods joining an array but, still, didn't work as quick as a for loop.

My function is:

function pad(str, max, padder) {
  padder = typeof padder === "undefined" ? "0" : padder;
  return str.toString().length < max ? pad(padder.toString() + str, max, padder) : str;
}

You can use my function with, or without, setting the padding variable. So like this:

pad(1, 3); // Returns '001'
// - Or -
pad(1, 3, "x"); // Returns 'xx1'

Personally, after my tests, I would use a method with a while loop, like Aleksandar Toplek or Vitim.us. However, I would modify it slightly so that you are able to set the padding string.

So, I would use this code:

function padLeft(str, len, pad) {
    pad = typeof pad === "undefined" ? "0" : pad + "";
    str = str + "";
    while(str.length < len) {
        str = pad + str;
    }
    return str;
}

// Usage
padLeft(1, 3); // Returns '001'
// - Or -
padLeft(1, 3, "x"); // Returns 'xx1'

You could also use it as a prototype function, by using this code:

Number.prototype.padLeft = function(len, pad) {
    pad = typeof pad === "undefined" ? "0" : pad + "";
    var str = this + "";
    while(str.length < len) {
        str = pad + str;
    }
    return str;
}

// Usage
var num = 1;

num.padLeft(3); // Returns '001'
// - Or -
num.padLeft(3, "x"); // Returns 'xx1'
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This method isn't faster, but it's fairly native.

zeroPad = function (num, count) {
    return [Math.pow(10, count - num.toString().length), num].join('').substr(1);
};
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just wanted to make the comment (but i don't have enough points) that the highest voted answer fails with negative numbers and decimals

function padNumber(n,pad) {
    p = Math.pow(10,pad);
    a = Math.abs(n);
    g = (n<0);
    return (a < p) ?  ((g ? '-' : '') + (p+a).toString().substring(1)) : n;
}

padNumber( -31.235, 5);

"-00031.235"
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Yet another version :

function zPad(s,n){
    return (new Array(n+1).join('0')+s).substr(-Math.max(n,s.toString().length));
}
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function zeroFill(number, width) {
    width -= (number.toString().length - /\./.test(number));
    if (width > 0) {
        return new Array(width + 1).join('0') + number;
    }
    return number + ""; // always return a string
}

Slight changes made to Peter's code. With his code if the input is (1.2, 3) the value returned should be 01.2 but it is returning 1.2. The changes here should correct that.

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function numberPadding(n, p) {
  n = n.toString();
  var len = p - n.length;
  if (len > 0) {
    for (var i=0; i < len; i++) {
      n = '0' + n;
    }
  }
  return n;
}
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1  
Elegant & Simple. Don't complicate stuff without necessity. –  der Nov 14 '12 at 16:31

A simple one for my use case (to fill milliseconds never > 999) You can adjust the number of zeros for yours or use a more generic way if required.

/**
 * @val integer
 * @zeros padding
 */
function zeroFill(val, zeros)
{
    var str = val.toString();
    if (str.length >= zeros)
        return str;
    str = "000" + str;
    return str.substring(str.length - zeros);
}
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My little contribution with this topic (https://gist.github.com/lucasferreira/a881606894dde5568029):

/* Autor: Lucas Ferreira - http://blog.lucasferreira.com | Usage: fz(9) or fz(100, 7) */
function fz(o, s) {
    for(var s=Math.max((+s||2),(n=""+Math.abs(o)).length); n.length<s; (n="0"+n));
    return (+o < 0 ? "-" : "") + n;
};

Usage:

fz(9) & fz(9, 2) == "09"
fz(-3, 2) == "-03"
fz(101, 7) == "0000101"

I know, it's a pretty dirty function, but it's fast and works even with negative numbers ;)

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function zFill(n,l){
    return 
      (l > n.toString().length) ? 
        ( (Array(l).join('0') + n).slice(-l) ) : n;
}
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Unfortunately, there are a lot of needless complicated suggestions for this problem, typically involving writing your own function to do math or string manipulation or calling a third-party utility. However, there is a standard way of doing this in the base JavaScript library with just one line of code. It might be worth wrapping this one line of code in a function to avoid having to specify parameters that you never want to change like the local name or style.

var amount = 5;

var text = amount.toLocaleString('en-US',
{
    style: 'decimal',
    minimumIntegerDigits: 3,
    useGrouping: false
});

This will produce the value of "005" for text. You can also use the toLocaleString function of Number to pad zeros to the right side of the decimal point.

var amount = 5;

var text = amount.toLocaleString('en-US',
{
    style: 'decimal',
    minimumFractionDigits: 2,
    useGrouping: false
});

This will produce the value of "5.00" for text. Change useGrouping to true to use comma separators for thousands.

Complete Example

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Even later to the party.

function zfill(num, len) {
  return(0 > num ? "-" : "") + (Math.pow(10, len) <= Math.abs(num) ? "0" + Math.abs(num) : Math.pow(10, len) + Math.abs(num)).toString().substr(1)
}

This handles negatives and situations where the number is longer than the field width. And floating-point.

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protected by Ionică Bizău Dec 2 at 18:19

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